Health Belief Model Perceptions, Knowledge of Heart Disease, and its Risk Factors in Educated African-American Women: An Exploration of the Relationships of Socioeconomic Status and Age

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149740
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Health Belief Model Perceptions, Knowledge of Heart Disease, and its Risk Factors in Educated African-American Women: An Exploration of the Relationships of Socioeconomic Status and Age
Abstract:
Health Belief Model Perceptions, Knowledge of Heart Disease, and its Risk Factors in Educated African-American Women: An Exploration of the Relationships of Socioeconomic Status and Age
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Jones, Deborah E., RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Maryland School of Nursing
Title:Assistant Professor
Co-Authors:Michael Weaver, RN, PhD; Susan J. Appel, APRN, BC, PhD; Diane Grimley, PhD; Jamy Ard, MD
[Scientific session research presentation] Problem: Heart disease is the leading cause of death for African-American women in the United States. Even though African-American women experience higher rates of heart disease with earlier onset and more severe consequences than White women do, they are not aware of their risk for the disease. The Health Belief Model (HBM) has been commonly used to guide preventive interventions in cardiovascular health. However, the HBM has not been evaluated for African-American women regarding its effectiveness. Objective: This study explored the perceptions of susceptibility and seriousness of heart disease, and the relationships between socioeconomic status (SES), age, and knowledge of heart disease and its risk factors. Design: Cross sectional surveyPopulation, Sample, Setting:  Educated African-American women (n=194) from the southern United States. Variables: Perceptions of susceptibility and seriousness of heart disease, SES, age, knowledge of heart disease and its risk factors, education. Results: The median age range was 45-54. Subjects were likely to be married (60.8%), have a graduate or professional education (60%), and have an income range of $50,000 - $74,999 (44.3%) and 1-3 persons in their family household (87.1%).  Median perceived susceptibility to heart disease was 3.  Median for seriousness was 4, which indicates that at least half of the participants had no opinion or was uncertain and half strongly agreed that heart disease is serious; in fact, 66.7% either agreed or strongly agreed that heart disease is serious, and only 13.5% disagreed or strongly disagreed that it is serious. The median score on the heart disease knowledge test was 11. Conclusion: Study findings demonstrated no relationship between perceived susceptibility or perceived seriousness and the independent variables (SES, age, and knowledge) in African American women.  Older African American women with higher SES perceived that they had higher susceptibility to heart disease and had higher perceptions of the seriousness of heart disease.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHealth Belief Model Perceptions, Knowledge of Heart Disease, and its Risk Factors in Educated African-American Women: An Exploration of the Relationships of Socioeconomic Status and Ageen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149740-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Health Belief Model Perceptions, Knowledge of Heart Disease, and its Risk Factors in Educated African-American Women: An Exploration of the Relationships of Socioeconomic Status and Age</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Jones, Deborah E., RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Maryland School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jones@son.umaryland.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Michael Weaver, RN, PhD; Susan J. Appel, APRN, BC, PhD; Diane Grimley, PhD; Jamy Ard, MD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Scientific session research presentation] Problem:&nbsp;Heart disease is the leading cause of death for African-American women in the United States. Even though African-American women experience higher rates of heart disease with earlier onset and more severe consequences than White women do, they are not aware of their risk for the disease.&nbsp;The Health Belief Model (HBM) has been commonly used to guide preventive interventions in cardiovascular health.&nbsp;However, the HBM has not been evaluated for African-American women regarding its effectiveness. Objective: This study explored the perceptions of susceptibility and seriousness of heart disease, and the relationships between socioeconomic status (SES), age, and knowledge of heart disease and its risk factors. Design: Cross sectional surveyPopulation, Sample, Setting:&nbsp; Educated African-American women (n=194) from the southern United States.&nbsp;Variables: Perceptions of susceptibility and seriousness of heart disease, SES, age, knowledge of heart disease and its risk factors, education. Results:&nbsp;The median age range was 45-54. Subjects were likely to be married (60.8%), have a graduate or professional education (60%), and have an income range of $50,000 - $74,999 (44.3%) and 1-3 persons in their family household (87.1%).&nbsp; Median perceived susceptibility to heart disease was 3.&nbsp; Median for seriousness was 4, which indicates that at least half of the participants had no opinion or was uncertain and half strongly agreed that heart disease is serious; in fact, 66.7% either agreed or strongly agreed that heart disease is serious, and only 13.5% disagreed or strongly disagreed that it is serious.&nbsp;The median score on the heart disease knowledge test was 11. Conclusion: Study findings demonstrated no relationship between perceived susceptibility or perceived seriousness and the independent variables (SES, age, and knowledge) in African American women.&nbsp; Older African American women with higher SES perceived that they had higher susceptibility to heart disease and had higher perceptions of the seriousness of heart disease.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:08:33Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:08:33Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.