Relationship of Nurse Satisfaction to Selected Unit Characteristics and Patient Satisfaction

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149763
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Relationship of Nurse Satisfaction to Selected Unit Characteristics and Patient Satisfaction
Abstract:
Relationship of Nurse Satisfaction to Selected Unit Characteristics and Patient Satisfaction
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:LaRochelle, Diane R., BSN, MSN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Baptist Health
Title:Senior Consultant Clinical Nursing Research
Co-Authors:Kathy Murray, MSN
[Scientific session research presentation] Purpose: To examine the relationship between nurses' job satisfaction, staffing patterns, and patient satisfaction.  We used hospital specific data on nurses' job satisfaction and unit staffing patterns from the National Database of Nursing Quality Indicators (NDNQI); and data on patient satisfaction from Gallop surveys to determine whether data sets designed for benchmarking provided useful data in additional analyses. Our framework  was "Caring Science" (Jean Watson, 2005). Design: A descriptive, exploratory design  was selected to answer two research questions:  1. What is the relationship between nurse?s job satisfaction and: total nursing hours per patient day; RN hours per patient day; overall patient satisfaction and; patients? satisfaction with nursing care?  2.  Which components of nurses' job satisfaction impact  patient?s overall satisfaction and satisfaction with nursing care?Methodology:  Third quarter NDNQI and Gallop data from critical care, progressive, and general medical-surgical units (n=8) in one large acute care general hospital for 2005 and 2006,  were subjected to statistical analysis using Spearman's rho  at the p<.05 level of significance.  Findings:  Significant positive correlations were found between: 1. total nursing hours per patient day and overall patient satisfaction (p=.004, 2005; p=.001, 2006) and patients? satisfaction with nursing care (p=.047, 2005; p=.002, 2006) and;  2. RN hours per patient day and overall patient satisfaction (p=.000, 2005 and p=.001, 2006) and patients' satisfaction with nursing care (p=.021, 2005 and p=.028, 2006) . Elements of nurses' job satisfaction showed no relationships to patient satisfaction in 2006.  In 2005  significance occurred between: 1. tasks (p=.010) and time for patient care (p=.000) and patients? overall satisfaction and;  2. between tasks (p=.000) and time for patient care (p=.004) and patients? satisfaction with nursing care.  Conclusion: We demonstrated the potential value of using existing data sets to test nursing hypotheses related to unit characteristics and patient outcomes.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRelationship of Nurse Satisfaction to Selected Unit Characteristics and Patient Satisfactionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149763-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Relationship of Nurse Satisfaction to Selected Unit Characteristics and Patient Satisfaction</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">LaRochelle, Diane R., BSN, MSN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Baptist Health</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Senior Consultant Clinical Nursing Research</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Diane.LaRochelle@bmcjax.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Kathy Murray, MSN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Scientific session research presentation] Purpose: To examine the relationship between nurses' job satisfaction, staffing patterns, and patient satisfaction.&nbsp; We used hospital specific data on nurses' job satisfaction and unit staffing patterns from the National Database of Nursing Quality Indicators (NDNQI); and data on patient satisfaction from Gallop surveys to determine&nbsp;whether data sets designed for benchmarking provided useful data in additional analyses. Our framework&nbsp; was &quot;Caring Science&quot; (Jean Watson, 2005). Design:&nbsp;A descriptive, exploratory design&nbsp; was selected to answer two research questions:&nbsp; 1. What is the relationship between nurse?s job satisfaction and: total nursing hours per patient day; RN hours per patient day; overall patient satisfaction and; patients? satisfaction with nursing care?&nbsp; 2.&nbsp; Which components of nurses' job satisfaction impact&nbsp; patient?s overall satisfaction and satisfaction with nursing care?Methodology:&nbsp; Third quarter NDNQI and Gallop data from critical care, progressive, and general medical-surgical units (n=8) in one large acute care general hospital for 2005 and 2006,&nbsp; were subjected to statistical analysis using Spearman's rho&nbsp; at the p&lt;.05 level of significance.&nbsp; Findings: &nbsp;Significant positive correlations&nbsp;were found&nbsp;between: 1. total nursing hours per patient day and overall patient satisfaction (p=.004, 2005; p=.001, 2006) and patients? satisfaction with nursing care (p=.047, 2005; p=.002, 2006) and;&nbsp;&nbsp;2. RN hours per patient day and overall patient satisfaction (p=.000, 2005 and p=.001, 2006) and patients' satisfaction with nursing care (p=.021, 2005 and p=.028, 2006) . Elements of nurses' job satisfaction showed no relationships to patient satisfaction in 2006.&nbsp; In 2005&nbsp;&nbsp;significance occurred between: 1. tasks (p=.010) and time for patient care (p=.000) and patients? overall satisfaction and;&nbsp; 2. between tasks (p=.000) and time for patient care (p=.004) and patients? satisfaction with nursing care.&nbsp; Conclusion: We demonstrated the potential&nbsp;value of using existing data sets to test nursing hypotheses related to unit characteristics and patient outcomes.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:09:01Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:09:01Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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