Bullying in the Workplace: Recognize it, Reconcile it, Renew from it

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Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149785
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Bullying in the Workplace: Recognize it, Reconcile it, Renew from it
Abstract:
Bullying in the Workplace: Recognize it, Reconcile it, Renew from it
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Mladineo, Christine, BSN, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center
Title:Staff nurse
[Scientific session research presentation] It is hard to image that a few nurses exhibit negative behavior toward other nurses. Sometimes referred to as horizontal violence, bullying is a significant issue faced by many nursing professionals. One study suggests that nurses were more concerned with bullying by another nurse than bullying by doctors or patients. (Farrell, 1997; Farrell, 2001; Raphael, 1992). As a profession that is designed to care and protect people it is ironic that this internal dilemma even exists. Although a bully can infect any type of workplace, nursing is especially susceptible due to inherent stresses and traditional pecking order (Sweet, 2005). A review of literature was done to define salient characteristics of bullying and uncover effective coping in a bullying situation. Using the salient characteristics of bullying will allow the nurse not to confuse a bullying situation and constructive criticism. Nurse targets can learn that self-concept plays an important role in the self-adaptation process that removes power from the bully. Thus self-concept can be used to defuse a potential cycle of bullying, end a cycle that already exists, and assist in recovery. Given the nursing shortage, it is imperative that bullying targets and their advocates stop the presence of bullying, sometimes referred to as "professional terrorism" (Farrell, 1997) in the nurse's workplace.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBullying in the Workplace: Recognize it, Reconcile it, Renew from iten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149785-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Bullying in the Workplace: Recognize it, Reconcile it, Renew from it</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Mladineo, Christine, BSN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Staff nurse</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">christine.mladineo@med.va.gov</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Scientific session research presentation] It is hard to image that a few nurses exhibit negative behavior toward other nurses. Sometimes referred to as horizontal violence, bullying is a significant issue faced by many nursing professionals. One study suggests that nurses were more concerned with bullying by another nurse than bullying by doctors or patients. (Farrell, 1997; Farrell, 2001; Raphael, 1992). As a profession that is designed to care and protect people it is ironic that this internal dilemma even exists. Although a bully can infect any type of workplace, nursing is especially susceptible due to inherent stresses and traditional pecking order (Sweet, 2005). A review of literature was done to define salient characteristics of bullying and uncover effective coping in a bullying situation. Using the salient characteristics of bullying will allow the nurse not to confuse a bullying situation and constructive criticism. Nurse targets can learn that self-concept plays an important role in the self-adaptation process that removes power from the bully. Thus self-concept can be used to defuse a potential cycle of bullying, end a cycle that already exists, and assist in recovery. Given the nursing shortage, it is imperative that bullying targets and their advocates stop the presence of bullying, sometimes referred to as &quot;professional terrorism&quot; (Farrell, 1997) in the nurse's workplace.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:09:29Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:09:29Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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