Women's Treatment-Seeking Behavior for Acute Myocardial Infarction: Antecedences and Consequences

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149786
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Women's Treatment-Seeking Behavior for Acute Myocardial Infarction: Antecedences and Consequences
Abstract:
Women's Treatment-Seeking Behavior for Acute Myocardial Infarction: Antecedences and Consequences
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Mohamed, Hanem, RN, PhD(C)
P.I. Institution Name:Case Western Reserve University
Title:RN, PhD (C)
Co-Authors:Faye A. Gary, EdD, RN, FAAN; Diana L. Morris, PhD, RN, FAAN; Marilyn "Lynn" J. Lotas, RN, PhD; Mark Carlson, MD; Hossein Yarandi, PhD
[Scientific session research presentation] Background: Acute Myocardial Infarction (AMI) is the number one killer for women in the US. Women are unaware of AMI risk factors and symptoms and perceive them as less serious.  As a result, women may engage in other treatment-seeking behavior prior to access medical care and have poor outcomes. Objectives: Based on Self-Regulation Theory, the aim was to understand what women know about AMI, and how they deal with having AMI.  Of specific interest were direct and indirect relationships between knowledge of AMI risk factors and symptoms, perception of symptoms seriousness, treatment-seeking behavior, time-to-treatment and psychological distress which has not been examined before. Methods: Using cross-sectional, descriptive correlational design, a convenience sample of 53 women who had first time AMI were interviewed.  Results: Three treatment-seeking behaviors were identified; contacting profession, self-medication and avoidance.  In spite of having high knowledge of AMI symptoms and perceiving the symptoms as very serious, most women (68%) used a self-medication behavior (told some one, tried to relax, tried self help remedies) before they call 911. Path analysis was used to examine the relationships among the independent variables knowledge of AMI symptom, knowledge of AMI risk factors, perception of symptoms seriousness, treatment-seeking behavior, time-to-treatment and the dependent variable psychological distress.  Education, race, marital status, type of treatment and perception of severity of AMI were treated as covariate. The independent variables were moderately correlated and all together explained 33% of variance on psychological distress.  Psychological distress was directly predicted by perception of symptoms seriousness and indirectly through treatment-seeking behavior and time-to-treatment.  Women who perceived their symptoms as serious, contacted profession, had shorter time-to-treatment and had low psychological distress and vice versa.  Implications: Larger samples and further research on the relationship between treatment-seeking behaviors and psychological outcomes for women may lead to new insight in potential moderator's effect.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWomen's Treatment-Seeking Behavior for Acute Myocardial Infarction: Antecedences and Consequencesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149786-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Women's Treatment-Seeking Behavior for Acute Myocardial Infarction: Antecedences and Consequences</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Mohamed, Hanem, RN, PhD(C)</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Case Western Reserve University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">RN, PhD (C)</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">hanemfm@hotmail.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Faye A. Gary, EdD, RN, FAAN; Diana L. Morris, PhD, RN, FAAN; Marilyn &quot;Lynn&quot; J. Lotas, RN, PhD; Mark Carlson, MD; Hossein Yarandi, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Scientific session research presentation] Background: Acute Myocardial Infarction (AMI) is the number one killer for women in the US. Women are unaware of AMI risk factors and symptoms and perceive them as less serious.&nbsp; As a result, women may engage in other treatment-seeking behavior prior to access medical care and have poor outcomes. Objectives: Based on Self-Regulation Theory, the aim was to understand what women know about AMI, and how they deal with having AMI.&nbsp; Of specific interest were direct and indirect relationships between knowledge of AMI risk factors and symptoms, perception of symptoms seriousness, treatment-seeking behavior, time-to-treatment and psychological distress which has not been examined before. Methods:&nbsp;Using cross-sectional, descriptive correlational design, a convenience sample of 53 women who had first time AMI were interviewed. &nbsp;Results: Three treatment-seeking behaviors were identified; contacting profession, self-medication and avoidance.&nbsp; In spite of having high knowledge of AMI symptoms and perceiving the symptoms as very serious, most women (68%) used a self-medication behavior (told some one, tried to relax, tried self help remedies) before they call 911.&nbsp;Path analysis was used to examine the relationships among the independent variables knowledge of AMI symptom, knowledge of AMI risk factors, perception of symptoms seriousness, treatment-seeking behavior, time-to-treatment and the dependent variable psychological distress.&nbsp; Education, race, marital status, type of treatment and perception of severity of AMI were treated as covariate.&nbsp;The independent variables were moderately correlated and all together explained 33% of variance on psychological distress.&nbsp; Psychological distress was directly predicted by perception of symptoms seriousness and indirectly through treatment-seeking behavior and time-to-treatment.&nbsp; Women who perceived their symptoms as serious, contacted profession, had shorter time-to-treatment and had low psychological distress and vice versa.&nbsp; Implications: Larger samples and further research on the relationship between treatment-seeking behaviors and psychological outcomes for women may lead to new insight in potential moderator's effect.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:09:30Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:09:30Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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