The Great Northeast Cookie Experiment: Innovations in Undergraduate Research Education

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149791
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Great Northeast Cookie Experiment: Innovations in Undergraduate Research Education
Abstract:
The Great Northeast Cookie Experiment: Innovations in Undergraduate Research Education
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Morton, Jennifer L., RN, MS, MPH
P.I. Institution Name:University of New England
Title:Assistant Professor
[Leadership session research presentation] Nursing educators are faced with the ongoing challenge of teaching complex research content to undergraduate nursing students. In recent years, efforts by educators to provide students with creative learning experiences that not only makes the conceptualization of the research process real, but also less anxiety provoking have posed a challenge.  In 1986, Theil developed the Great American Cookie Experiment (TGACE) as a way to accomplish this.  Since then, one other refinement of this original experiment has been published.The Great Northeast Cookie Experiment (TGNCE) served as a further refinement of this experiment by combining "numbers and stories" for a quantitative/qualitative component to research design.  A descriptive design combined with a qualitative question based on phenomenology helped guide this innovative learning strategy that aided students in learning both basic and complex research concepts. Eleven undergraduate research students served as a collaborative research team in the design and implementation of the study.  This included; a comprehensive literature review, problem statement, purpose, application to the IRB, construction of informed consent, selection of a cohort sample based on power analysis, selection of methods, revisions, and data collection.  Students also participated in data analysis in the classroom setting, utilizing SPSS.These students, having learned collaboratively for three years were able to troubleshoot individual research tasks based on their own self perceived strengths. Mentored research teams in the classroom can serve as a valuable impetus to help students conceptualize the research process and subsequently become willing participants in evidence based practice.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Great Northeast Cookie Experiment: Innovations in Undergraduate Research Educationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149791-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Great Northeast Cookie Experiment: Innovations in Undergraduate Research Education</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Morton, Jennifer L., RN, MS, MPH</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of New England</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jmorton@une.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Leadership session research presentation] Nursing educators are faced with the ongoing challenge of teaching complex research content to undergraduate nursing students. In recent years, efforts by educators to provide students with creative learning experiences that not only makes the conceptualization of the research process real, but also less anxiety provoking have posed a challenge.&nbsp; In 1986, Theil developed the Great American Cookie Experiment (TGACE) as a way to accomplish this.&nbsp; Since then, one other refinement of this original experiment has been published.The Great Northeast Cookie Experiment (TGNCE) served as a further refinement of this experiment by combining &quot;numbers and stories&quot; for a quantitative/qualitative component to research design.&nbsp; A descriptive design combined with a qualitative question based on phenomenology helped guide this innovative learning strategy that aided students in learning both basic and complex research concepts. Eleven undergraduate research students served as a collaborative research team in the design and implementation of the study.&nbsp; This included; a comprehensive literature review, problem statement, purpose, application to the IRB, construction of informed consent, selection of a cohort sample based on power analysis, selection of methods, revisions, and data collection.&nbsp; Students also participated in data analysis in the classroom setting, utilizing SPSS.These students, having learned collaboratively for three years were able to troubleshoot individual research tasks based on their own self perceived strengths. Mentored research teams in the classroom can serve as a valuable impetus to help students conceptualize the research process and subsequently become willing participants in evidence based practice.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:09:36Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:09:36Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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