The Time of Day Myocardial Infarction Symptoms Begin in Adult Females and Adult Males: A Pilot Study

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149810
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Time of Day Myocardial Infarction Symptoms Begin in Adult Females and Adult Males: A Pilot Study
Abstract:
The Time of Day Myocardial Infarction Symptoms Begin in Adult Females and Adult Males: A Pilot Study
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Matura, Lea Ann, MS, RN, NP-C, CCRN
P.I. Institution Name:The Methodist Hospital
Title:Advanced Practice Nurse
The purpose of this study was to determine if there are differences in the timing of myocardial infarctions (MI) between adult females and adult males.The research questions were: (1) Do females and males with a discharge diagnosis of acute MI differ in the time that MI symptoms begin? (2) Does time of symptom onset of MIs and time of presentation for medical treatment differ between females and males? The design was a retrospective, comparative study. The sample included females and males with a discharge diagnosis of acute MI. The sample size was 10% of 625 or 62 subjects for the pilot study. Data elements extracted were: age, sex, ethnicity, time when MI symptoms began, time of presentation for medical treatment, history of coronary heart disease (CHD), and risk factors for CHD. Females and males were not statistically different based on demographics, presenting symptoms, risk factors for CHD, mortality, or presentation place for medical treatment. Seventy-one percent of females reported chest pain as their primary symptom compared to 59% of males. Results demonstrated there was no significant difference in the time of day that MI symptoms began between females and males, chi square=3.798, p=.284. Females reported MI symptoms beginning more frequently in the morning hours (06:01-12:00); while men reported MI symptoms beginning in the afternoon (12:01-18:00). Findings showed that there was not a significant difference between females and males and the time difference between MI symptoms beginning and presentation for medical treatment, using an independent samples t-test, t=-.965, p=.34. Females tended to take less time to present for treatment (mean=771 minutes; SD=2,274 minutes) than males (mean=1,826 minutes; SD=4,341 minutes). Sixty-four percent of the females had a history of CHD. This history may have prompted the females to seek medical treatment in a timelier manner than males.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Time of Day Myocardial Infarction Symptoms Begin in Adult Females and Adult Males: A Pilot Studyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149810-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Time of Day Myocardial Infarction Symptoms Begin in Adult Females and Adult Males: A Pilot Study</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Matura, Lea Ann, MS, RN, NP-C, CCRN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">The Methodist Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Advanced Practice Nurse</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lamatura@tmh.tmc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this study was to determine if there are differences in the timing of myocardial infarctions (MI) between adult females and adult males.The research questions were: (1) Do females and males with a discharge diagnosis of acute MI differ in the time that MI symptoms begin? (2) Does time of symptom onset of MIs and time of presentation for medical treatment differ between females and males? The design was a retrospective, comparative study. The sample included females and males with a discharge diagnosis of acute MI. The sample size was 10% of 625 or 62 subjects for the pilot study. Data elements extracted were: age, sex, ethnicity, time when MI symptoms began, time of presentation for medical treatment, history of coronary heart disease (CHD), and risk factors for CHD. Females and males were not statistically different based on demographics, presenting symptoms, risk factors for CHD, mortality, or presentation place for medical treatment. Seventy-one percent of females reported chest pain as their primary symptom compared to 59% of males. Results demonstrated there was no significant difference in the time of day that MI symptoms began between females and males, chi square=3.798, p=.284. Females reported MI symptoms beginning more frequently in the morning hours (06:01-12:00); while men reported MI symptoms beginning in the afternoon (12:01-18:00). Findings showed that there was not a significant difference between females and males and the time difference between MI symptoms beginning and presentation for medical treatment, using an independent samples t-test, t=-.965, p=.34. Females tended to take less time to present for treatment (mean=771 minutes; SD=2,274 minutes) than males (mean=1,826 minutes; SD=4,341 minutes). Sixty-four percent of the females had a history of CHD. This history may have prompted the females to seek medical treatment in a timelier manner than males.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:10:01Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:10:01Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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