2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149811
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Mentoring Students for Success in Nursing
Abstract:
Mentoring Students for Success in Nursing
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:McAllister, Lydia E., RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Seattle University
Title:Focus Groups with Diverse High School Students Used for Program Evaluation
Co-Authors:Astrid H. Wilson, RN, DSN; Susan Sanner, PhD, RN, C-FNP
Student nurses move from novice to beginning competency with enormous expectations from their faculty, their peers and themselves. These expectations lead to stress that may be beyond the level of endurance. Retaining students from vulnerable populations is even more of a challenge for nursing faculty and mentoring may be the answer that experienced nursing faculty use to bridge the gap between theory and the reality of nursing practice. In fact, for the struggling student mentoring is the greatest gift that faculty can give the student (Smith, McAllister & Crawford, 2001). After all, even Florence Nightingale the first researcher, educator, clinician and policy analyst was mentored by the British Secretary of War Sir Sidney Herbert (Fields, 1991; Stachura & Hoff, 1990). The purpose of this presentation is to describe the development of a mentoring program designed for disadvantaged students. Mentoring is defined; characteristics and roles of mentors and mentees are explored. Included is the discussion of faculty preparation, stages of program development and program evaluation. The presentation also provides strategies to assist students from vulnerable populations however; these benefits will assist all faculty and students who will practice in diverse settings. Due to the changing healthcare environment, the role of the nurse will require greater clinical and cultural competence. Mentors can facilitate important nursing skills as well as the transition between theory and reality. Mentoring programs can be created that will facilitate the development of mentoring relationships thereby building and promoting all who participate.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMentoring Students for Success in Nursingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149811-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Mentoring Students for Success in Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">McAllister, Lydia E., RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Seattle University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Focus Groups with Diverse High School Students Used for Program Evaluation</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mcallisterl@seattleu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Astrid H. Wilson, RN, DSN; Susan Sanner, PhD, RN, C-FNP</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Student nurses move from novice to beginning competency with enormous expectations from their faculty, their peers and themselves. These expectations lead to stress that may be beyond the level of endurance. Retaining students from vulnerable populations is even more of a challenge for nursing faculty and mentoring may be the answer that experienced nursing faculty use to bridge the gap between theory and the reality of nursing practice. In fact, for the struggling student mentoring is the greatest gift that faculty can give the student (Smith, McAllister &amp; Crawford, 2001). After all, even Florence Nightingale the first researcher, educator, clinician and policy analyst was mentored by the British Secretary of War Sir Sidney Herbert (Fields, 1991; Stachura &amp; Hoff, 1990). The purpose of this presentation is to describe the development of a mentoring program designed for disadvantaged students. Mentoring is defined; characteristics and roles of mentors and mentees are explored. Included is the discussion of faculty preparation, stages of program development and program evaluation. The presentation also provides strategies to assist students from vulnerable populations however; these benefits will assist all faculty and students who will practice in diverse settings. Due to the changing healthcare environment, the role of the nurse will require greater clinical and cultural competence. Mentors can facilitate important nursing skills as well as the transition between theory and reality. Mentoring programs can be created that will facilitate the development of mentoring relationships thereby building and promoting all who participate.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:10:02Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:10:02Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.