2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149812
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Lived Experience of Considering Unionization
Abstract:
The Lived Experience of Considering Unionization
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:McCaffrey, Ruth, ND, ARNP-BC
P.I. Institution Name:Florida Atlantic University
Co-Authors:Kevin McCarthy, MS, ARNP
The decision among hospital nursing staff to unionize or to remain independent of unions is often difficult and fraught with anxiety, uncertainty, and frustration. Participation in unions among nurses is growing and is expected to continue to grow over the next twenty years. Throughout nursing history, the battle between the demands of the workplace and remaining steadfast in caring for patients has caused dissatisfaction and uncertainty among nurses. The purpose of this phenomenological study is to understand the lived experience of the unionization process decision reached by one hospital's nursing staff. Five nurses who worked in hospitals where unionization had been considered were interviewed to determine the experience of living through a unionization vote. Two themes emerged form the interviews. The first theme was that of an unheard professional voice. Nurses often resorted to accepting unionization when they had exhausted other attempts to be heard by managers and workplace leaders. The second theme was the perceived inability to positively affect patient care. Nurses stated that they felt ?locked out? of discussions about nursing care delivery and how to best provide for the needs of patients. Nurses in this study indicated a genuine commitment to the patients for which they care. The nurses interviewed felt strongly that they should have a voice in the design of patient care models and practices. The findings of this study are consistent with the work of Aiken et al (2002) who found that nursing burnout levels exceed the norms for other health care workers and job dissatisfaction is four times greater than the average for all US workers. In this study it appears some nurses look to unions to bring nurses' issues to the table and develop a cohesive community and speaking with a voice that can not be ignored.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Lived Experience of Considering Unionizationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149812-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Lived Experience of Considering Unionization</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">McCaffrey, Ruth, ND, ARNP-BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Florida Atlantic University</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">rmccaffr@fau.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Kevin McCarthy, MS, ARNP</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The decision among hospital nursing staff to unionize or to remain independent of unions is often difficult and fraught with anxiety, uncertainty, and frustration. Participation in unions among nurses is growing and is expected to continue to grow over the next twenty years. Throughout nursing history, the battle between the demands of the workplace and remaining steadfast in caring for patients has caused dissatisfaction and uncertainty among nurses. The purpose of this phenomenological study is to understand the lived experience of the unionization process decision reached by one hospital's nursing staff. Five nurses who worked in hospitals where unionization had been considered were interviewed to determine the experience of living through a unionization vote. Two themes emerged form the interviews. The first theme was that of an unheard professional voice. Nurses often resorted to accepting unionization when they had exhausted other attempts to be heard by managers and workplace leaders. The second theme was the perceived inability to positively affect patient care. Nurses stated that they felt ?locked out? of discussions about nursing care delivery and how to best provide for the needs of patients. Nurses in this study indicated a genuine commitment to the patients for which they care. The nurses interviewed felt strongly that they should have a voice in the design of patient care models and practices. The findings of this study are consistent with the work of Aiken et al (2002) who found that nursing burnout levels exceed the norms for other health care workers and job dissatisfaction is four times greater than the average for all US workers. In this study it appears some nurses look to unions to bring nurses' issues to the table and develop a cohesive community and speaking with a voice that can not be ignored.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:10:03Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:10:03Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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