The Perceived Barriers and Incentives to Obtaining a BSN Degree for Returning RN Students: A Phenomenological Study

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149815
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Perceived Barriers and Incentives to Obtaining a BSN Degree for Returning RN Students: A Phenomenological Study
Abstract:
The Perceived Barriers and Incentives to Obtaining a BSN Degree for Returning RN Students: A Phenomenological Study
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Megginson, Lucinda, MSN, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of West Georgia
Title:MSN student; Staff Educator, Women's & Children's Services
Objective: To explore, describe, and analyze perceived barriers and incentives of returning diploma and ASN RNs in the quest to acquire a BSN. Design: Qualitative using phenomenological inquiry. Population, Sample, Setting: RN-BSN students; 6 ASN or diploma RN-BSN students; Southeastern USA; 2004. Concept studied: Description of incentives and barriers experienced by RNs in obtaining a BSN. Methods: Purposive sample of RN-BSN students participated in focus group, audio-taped interviews which continued until redundancy in data was achieved. Data transcriptions were analyzed using Colaizzi's (1978) phenomenological method. Findings: The constitutive pattern, Incentives Encountered by RN-BSN Students, included 6 themes: (a) Looking for a point in time: Being at the right time and place in life, (b) Looking forward: Continuing to work with options, (c) Looking inward: Advancing education is achieving a personal goal, (d) Others looking at me: Believing a BSN provides a credible professional identity, (e) Looking for support: Being encouraged by contemporaries to return to school, and (f) Looking for a place: Finding accepting and user-friendly RN-BSN programs. The constitutive pattern, Barriers Encountered by RN-BSN Students, included 5 themes: a) Not enough: Time, (b) Not enough confidence: Fear, (c) Not enough recognition: Past educational and life accomplishments, (d) Not enough differentiation: Equal treatment of BSN, ASN, and diploma RNs, and (e) Not enough basic academic support: Negative ASN or diploma school experience. Conclusions and Implications: RN-BSN educational mobility is imperative as: a) approximately 70% of practicing RNs (USA) are educated at the ASN or diploma level (Spratley, et. al, 2001); b) nurse academicians and leaders are retiring in large numbers; and c) research links BSN-educated RNs with improved patient outcomes (Aiken, et. al, 2003). Measures to foster incentives and inhibit barriers (caring curricula, recognition of different educational levels) should be implemented at all levels of nursing practice, management, and academia.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Perceived Barriers and Incentives to Obtaining a BSN Degree for Returning RN Students: A Phenomenological Studyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149815-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Perceived Barriers and Incentives to Obtaining a BSN Degree for Returning RN Students: A Phenomenological Study</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Megginson, Lucinda, MSN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of West Georgia</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">MSN student; Staff Educator, Women's &amp; Children's Services</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">teammegginson@yahoo.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: To explore, describe, and analyze perceived barriers and incentives of returning diploma and ASN RNs in the quest to acquire a BSN. Design: Qualitative using phenomenological inquiry. Population, Sample, Setting: RN-BSN students; 6 ASN or diploma RN-BSN students; Southeastern USA; 2004. Concept studied: Description of incentives and barriers experienced by RNs in obtaining a BSN. Methods: Purposive sample of RN-BSN students participated in focus group, audio-taped interviews which continued until redundancy in data was achieved. Data transcriptions were analyzed using Colaizzi's (1978) phenomenological method. Findings: The constitutive pattern, Incentives Encountered by RN-BSN Students, included 6 themes: (a) Looking for a point in time: Being at the right time and place in life, (b) Looking forward: Continuing to work with options, (c) Looking inward: Advancing education is achieving a personal goal, (d) Others looking at me: Believing a BSN provides a credible professional identity, (e) Looking for support: Being encouraged by contemporaries to return to school, and (f) Looking for a place: Finding accepting and user-friendly RN-BSN programs. The constitutive pattern, Barriers Encountered by RN-BSN Students, included 5 themes: a) Not enough: Time, (b) Not enough confidence: Fear, (c) Not enough recognition: Past educational and life accomplishments, (d) Not enough differentiation: Equal treatment of BSN, ASN, and diploma RNs, and (e) Not enough basic academic support: Negative ASN or diploma school experience. Conclusions and Implications: RN-BSN educational mobility is imperative as: a) approximately 70% of practicing RNs (USA) are educated at the ASN or diploma level (Spratley, et. al, 2001); b) nurse academicians and leaders are retiring in large numbers; and c) research links BSN-educated RNs with improved patient outcomes (Aiken, et. al, 2003). Measures to foster incentives and inhibit barriers (caring curricula, recognition of different educational levels) should be implemented at all levels of nursing practice, management, and academia.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:10:07Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:10:07Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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