2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149826
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Visually Impaired Older Adults and Driving Cessation
Abstract:
Visually Impaired Older Adults and Driving Cessation
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Moore, Linda Weaver, PhD, RN, CNS
P.I. Institution Name:Xavier University
Title:Associate Professor
Co-Authors:Margaret M. Miller, EdD, RN, CNS
In America, a personal vehicle represents more than a means of transportation and mobility. Driving is equated with freedom and independence. As the older adult population increases, greater numbers of individuals will experience the significant life event, giving up driving. The purpose of this presentation is to describe the experience of driving cessation for older adults living with severe visual impairment due to bilateral macular degeneration. Parse's Human Becoming School of Thought provided the theoretical base for this study. Choices made are reflective of what is valued by humans. As humans share their stories, meaning is given to the reality of their experiences. Health is viewed as a changing continuous process that is lived differently by every individual. What the participants' value is apparent through the choices they make regarding their experiences of driving and driving cessation. Van Manen's phenomenological approach was used to reveal the human experience as it was lived. Nine community dwelling men and women aged 60 years and older were interviewed. All had been diagnosed with bilateral macular degeneration, were severely visually impaired, and were no longer driving. Other data sources were used to enhance the understanding of driving cessation and to more fully complete the existential investigation. A thematic analysis was conducted to determine essential themes. Data analysis revealed how the older adults came to know of the need to relinquish driving privileges. Further analysis highlighted the significant life challenges the older adults experienced as non-drivers. Understanding the driving cessation experience of older adults with severe visual impairment will enable nurses to facilitate older adults' transition from being drivers to non-drivers. Findings also provide an understanding of the calculated risks that older drivers with visual deficits may be willing to take during this transition.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleVisually Impaired Older Adults and Driving Cessationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149826-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Visually Impaired Older Adults and Driving Cessation</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Moore, Linda Weaver, PhD, RN, CNS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Xavier University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">moore@xavier.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Margaret M. Miller, EdD, RN, CNS</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">In America, a personal vehicle represents more than a means of transportation and mobility. Driving is equated with freedom and independence. As the older adult population increases, greater numbers of individuals will experience the significant life event, giving up driving. The purpose of this presentation is to describe the experience of driving cessation for older adults living with severe visual impairment due to bilateral macular degeneration. Parse's Human Becoming School of Thought provided the theoretical base for this study. Choices made are reflective of what is valued by humans. As humans share their stories, meaning is given to the reality of their experiences. Health is viewed as a changing continuous process that is lived differently by every individual. What the participants' value is apparent through the choices they make regarding their experiences of driving and driving cessation. Van Manen's phenomenological approach was used to reveal the human experience as it was lived. Nine community dwelling men and women aged 60 years and older were interviewed. All had been diagnosed with bilateral macular degeneration, were severely visually impaired, and were no longer driving. Other data sources were used to enhance the understanding of driving cessation and to more fully complete the existential investigation. A thematic analysis was conducted to determine essential themes. Data analysis revealed how the older adults came to know of the need to relinquish driving privileges. Further analysis highlighted the significant life challenges the older adults experienced as non-drivers. Understanding the driving cessation experience of older adults with severe visual impairment will enable nurses to facilitate older adults' transition from being drivers to non-drivers. Findings also provide an understanding of the calculated risks that older drivers with visual deficits may be willing to take during this transition.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:10:21Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:10:21Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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