Doula Support and Attitudes of Intrapartum Nurses: A Qualitative Study of the Patient's Perspective

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149836
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Doula Support and Attitudes of Intrapartum Nurses: A Qualitative Study of the Patient's Perspective
Abstract:
Doula Support and Attitudes of Intrapartum Nurses: A Qualitative Study of the Patient's Perspective
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Papagni, Karla, BS, UANS
P.I. Institution Name:University of Alabama at Birmingham
Title:Student
A doula is a woman trained and experienced in childbirth who provides continuous physical, emotional, and informational support to a woman during labor, childbirth and the immediate postpartum period. The role of the intrapartum nurse and professional doula differ markedly, yet should complement each other. For doulas and nurses to work together, they must develop a relationship based on mutual respect in order to facilitate a positive birth experience for the patient. The purpose of this study is to examine the level of acceptance shown by intrapartum nurses for doula support as perceived by the patient. This is a descriptive qualitative study in which data were collected via email interviews with women who have given birth in a hospital setting with the assistance of a professional doula (n = 9). A series of twelve questions were asked to investigate how women perceived the relationship between their nurse and doula and how that relationship affected their birth experience. Questions were designed by the investigator and reviewed for content validity by a nurse educator, a midwife, an intrapartum nurse and a doula. Data reveal a dichotomy with prevailing themes ranging from acceptance and affirmation to resentment and animosity. Nurses must recognize that their attitude regarding their patient's choice for doula support has a significant impact on the patient's perception of their birth experience. If both members of this labor team are able to value and respect each other's roles, they can work together to provide women with safe and rewarding births.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDoula Support and Attitudes of Intrapartum Nurses: A Qualitative Study of the Patient's Perspectiveen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149836-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Doula Support and Attitudes of Intrapartum Nurses: A Qualitative Study of the Patient's Perspective</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Papagni, Karla, BS, UANS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Alabama at Birmingham</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Student</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kpapagni@peds.uab.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">A doula is a woman trained and experienced in childbirth who provides continuous physical, emotional, and informational support to a woman during labor, childbirth and the immediate postpartum period. The role of the intrapartum nurse and professional doula differ markedly, yet should complement each other. For doulas and nurses to work together, they must develop a relationship based on mutual respect in order to facilitate a positive birth experience for the patient. The purpose of this study is to examine the level of acceptance shown by intrapartum nurses for doula support as perceived by the patient. This is a descriptive qualitative study in which data were collected via email interviews with women who have given birth in a hospital setting with the assistance of a professional doula (n = 9). A series of twelve questions were asked to investigate how women perceived the relationship between their nurse and doula and how that relationship affected their birth experience. Questions were designed by the investigator and reviewed for content validity by a nurse educator, a midwife, an intrapartum nurse and a doula. Data reveal a dichotomy with prevailing themes ranging from acceptance and affirmation to resentment and animosity. Nurses must recognize that their attitude regarding their patient's choice for doula support has a significant impact on the patient's perception of their birth experience. If both members of this labor team are able to value and respect each other's roles, they can work together to provide women with safe and rewarding births.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:10:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:10:34Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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