Peer Relationships in Adolescent Women With a Neurological Disability

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149856
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Peer Relationships in Adolescent Women With a Neurological Disability
Abstract:
Peer Relationships in Adolescent Women With a Neurological Disability
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Sawin, Kathleen J., DNS, CPNP, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and Childrens Hospital of Wisconsin
Title:Professor and Joint Research Chair in the Nursing of Children
Co-Authors:Gayle Roux, PhD, RN, CNS, NP-C; Melissa Belin, MSW
Compared to adolescents without disabilities, social relationships are considerably more complex for those with disabilities. This qualitative component of a larger mixed-method study of adaptation examined peer relationships in 31 adolescent women with spina bifida. The theoretical framework for this study integrates the Ecological Model of Spina Bifida Adaptation with the Middle-Range Theory of Inner Strength in Women living with chronic health conditions. These theories describe a process of response and adaptation to a chronic condition. The participants were interviewed, and content analysis was conducted for common themes. Ages of the participants ranged from 12-21 years, with a mean age of 15.84 years. The levels of lesions spanned all levels of the spinal cord in a fairly equal distribution: thoracic/high lumbar (25.81%), lumbar (32.26%), lumbosacral (22.58%) or sacral (19.35%) lesion. The six major themes identified were: Peers without Disabilities, Peers with Disabilities, Normalization, Challenges in Peer Connectedness, Peer Connectedness with Adults, and Romantic Connectedness. While some participants voiced close connections with peers, other stories highlighted prejudices, stereotyping, and limited dating experiences. In the sample 34% had been on an individual date, includes those in committed relationships and those who had chaperoned dates; 30% reported group dates, while 36% had never dated at all. These adolescents overwhelmingly reported that that they had sexual feelings similar to their peers. Implications for nursing include integrating social development data into universal screening for all adolescents with spina bifida. A progression to intervention studies testing strategies to improve social and sexual development is needed. Interventions need to initiate in preadolescence and include those youth with and without disabilities. Results of future intervention studies need to be readily translated into policy with school and social programs to enhance the connectedness and health of young women living with SB and other chronic health conditions.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePeer Relationships in Adolescent Women With a Neurological Disabilityen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149856-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Peer Relationships in Adolescent Women With a Neurological Disability</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Sawin, Kathleen J., DNS, CPNP, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and Childrens Hospital of Wisconsin</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor and Joint Research Chair in the Nursing of Children</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">sawin@uwm.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Gayle Roux, PhD, RN, CNS, NP-C; Melissa Belin, MSW</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Compared to adolescents without disabilities, social relationships are considerably more complex for those with disabilities. This qualitative component of a larger mixed-method study of adaptation examined peer relationships in 31 adolescent women with spina bifida. The theoretical framework for this study integrates the Ecological Model of Spina Bifida Adaptation with the Middle-Range Theory of Inner Strength in Women living with chronic health conditions. These theories describe a process of response and adaptation to a chronic condition. The participants were interviewed, and content analysis was conducted for common themes. Ages of the participants ranged from 12-21 years, with a mean age of 15.84 years. The levels of lesions spanned all levels of the spinal cord in a fairly equal distribution: thoracic/high lumbar (25.81%), lumbar (32.26%), lumbosacral (22.58%) or sacral (19.35%) lesion. The six major themes identified were: Peers without Disabilities, Peers with Disabilities, Normalization, Challenges in Peer Connectedness, Peer Connectedness with Adults, and Romantic Connectedness. While some participants voiced close connections with peers, other stories highlighted prejudices, stereotyping, and limited dating experiences. In the sample 34% had been on an individual date, includes those in committed relationships and those who had chaperoned dates; 30% reported group dates, while 36% had never dated at all. These adolescents overwhelmingly reported that that they had sexual feelings similar to their peers. Implications for nursing include integrating social development data into universal screening for all adolescents with spina bifida. A progression to intervention studies testing strategies to improve social and sexual development is needed. Interventions need to initiate in preadolescence and include those youth with and without disabilities. Results of future intervention studies need to be readily translated into policy with school and social programs to enhance the connectedness and health of young women living with SB and other chronic health conditions.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:11:00Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:11:00Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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