The Benefits and Challenges of Community-Based Service Learning for Nursing Students and Community Partners Caring for Vulnerable Populations

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149875
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Benefits and Challenges of Community-Based Service Learning for Nursing Students and Community Partners Caring for Vulnerable Populations
Abstract:
The Benefits and Challenges of Community-Based Service Learning for Nursing Students and Community Partners Caring for Vulnerable Populations
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Sternas, Kathleen A., PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Seton Hall University
Title:Associate Professor
Co-Authors:Mary Ann Scharf, EdD
Objectives: To describe the benefits and challenges for students and community partners collaborating on service learning projects for vulnerable populations. Sample: Traditional (n=61) and accelerated (second degree, n=55) community health nursing students and 23 agency partners participated. Design: A descriptive design was used. Variables: cultural awareness; competence in assessment and interventions; collaboration with diverse professionals; leadership; Internet abilities; interest in community nursing; usefulness of project findings; benefits and challenges. Methods: Students developed a partnership with an agency caring for vulnerable populations, assessed the community and identified a topic for intervention. Topics included: homelessness; prenatal mothers; children; asthma; obesity; alcohol; smoking; lead poisoning; immunizations; violence, chronic and communicable diseases; polypharmacy; bioterrorism. Students participated in focus groups and partners participated in interviews. Both completed evaluations which measured outcomes. Findings: Student benefits: expertise in caring for vulnerable populations; interest in community nursing; experiences with barriers to healthcare; cultural competence; exposure to role models; knowledge of community resources; increased critical thinking, leadership, organization, teaching, collaboration and Internet skills. Traditional and accelerated students (100%) agreed experiences promoted cultural awareness; 100% traditional and 96.88% accelerated reported increased competence in assessing and planning interventions. Partner benefits were: new health programs and educational materials; knowledge about health problems and resources; increased client teaching and STD clinic attendance; students working for agency. Partners (100%) agreed the assessments and interventions met community needs, and findings were useful for program planning/grants. Challenges for students and partners were: time constraints; limited resources; language and education barriers, and group issues. Conclusions: Service learning has multiple benefits for partners and students caring for vulnerable populations. Projects help partners meet assessment and intervention needs of their community and increase students' knowledge about vulnerable populations. Challenges were few. Implications: Important to educate nurses about the benefits and challenges of service learning for students, community partners, and meeting needs of vulnerable populations.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Benefits and Challenges of Community-Based Service Learning for Nursing Students and Community Partners Caring for Vulnerable Populationsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149875-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Benefits and Challenges of Community-Based Service Learning for Nursing Students and Community Partners Caring for Vulnerable Populations</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Sternas, Kathleen A., PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Seton Hall University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">sternaka@shu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Mary Ann Scharf, EdD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objectives: To describe the benefits and challenges for students and community partners collaborating on service learning projects for vulnerable populations. Sample: Traditional (n=61) and accelerated (second degree, n=55) community health nursing students and 23 agency partners participated. Design: A descriptive design was used. Variables: cultural awareness; competence in assessment and interventions; collaboration with diverse professionals; leadership; Internet abilities; interest in community nursing; usefulness of project findings; benefits and challenges. Methods: Students developed a partnership with an agency caring for vulnerable populations, assessed the community and identified a topic for intervention. Topics included: homelessness; prenatal mothers; children; asthma; obesity; alcohol; smoking; lead poisoning; immunizations; violence, chronic and communicable diseases; polypharmacy; bioterrorism. Students participated in focus groups and partners participated in interviews. Both completed evaluations which measured outcomes. Findings: Student benefits: expertise in caring for vulnerable populations; interest in community nursing; experiences with barriers to healthcare; cultural competence; exposure to role models; knowledge of community resources; increased critical thinking, leadership, organization, teaching, collaboration and Internet skills. Traditional and accelerated students (100%) agreed experiences promoted cultural awareness; 100% traditional and 96.88% accelerated reported increased competence in assessing and planning interventions. Partner benefits were: new health programs and educational materials; knowledge about health problems and resources; increased client teaching and STD clinic attendance; students working for agency. Partners (100%) agreed the assessments and interventions met community needs, and findings were useful for program planning/grants. Challenges for students and partners were: time constraints; limited resources; language and education barriers, and group issues. Conclusions: Service learning has multiple benefits for partners and students caring for vulnerable populations. Projects help partners meet assessment and intervention needs of their community and increase students' knowledge about vulnerable populations. Challenges were few. Implications: Important to educate nurses about the benefits and challenges of service learning for students, community partners, and meeting needs of vulnerable populations.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:11:30Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:11:30Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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