The Voices of Psychiatric Community Health Nurses: An Issue of Ethics and Care

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149878
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Voices of Psychiatric Community Health Nurses: An Issue of Ethics and Care
Abstract:
The Voices of Psychiatric Community Health Nurses: An Issue of Ethics and Care
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Sturm, Bonnie, EdD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Seton Hall University, College of Nursing
Title:Assistant Professor
This ethnographic study explored, described, and documented psychiatric community health nurse (PCHN) practices and practice issues that are influenced by an ethic of care. Nurses experience conflict when they engage in caring acts, but are confronted by strict regulatory mechanisms imposed by third party insurance payers. The PCHNs experienced moral distress and were acutely aware that many of their patients were not receiving necessary care. These nurses knew how to make a difference in the lives of individuals with chronic persistent mental illness. They also knew that ongoing and consistent quality care for this marginalized population is not well funded or even widely recognized as worthwhile supporting. Giving nurses a voice to express these ethically laden issues is imperative for initiating and supporting needed reform in this area. This dramatic monologue, performed by the researcher, serves to creatively and realistically engage the audience in the direct aesthetic experience of the nature of conflict these nurses encountered in practice. It can allow the voices of nurses who participated in this research study to be directly experienced in the conference setting. The dramatic monologue is best performed in front of an audience, but could be recorded if presentation restrictions necessitated this accommodation.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Voices of Psychiatric Community Health Nurses: An Issue of Ethics and Careen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149878-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Voices of Psychiatric Community Health Nurses: An Issue of Ethics and Care</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Sturm, Bonnie, EdD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Seton Hall University, College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">sturmbon@shu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">This ethnographic study explored, described, and documented psychiatric community health nurse (PCHN) practices and practice issues that are influenced by an ethic of care. Nurses experience conflict when they engage in caring acts, but are confronted by strict regulatory mechanisms imposed by third party insurance payers. The PCHNs experienced moral distress and were acutely aware that many of their patients were not receiving necessary care. These nurses knew how to make a difference in the lives of individuals with chronic persistent mental illness. They also knew that ongoing and consistent quality care for this marginalized population is not well funded or even widely recognized as worthwhile supporting. Giving nurses a voice to express these ethically laden issues is imperative for initiating and supporting needed reform in this area. This dramatic monologue, performed by the researcher, serves to creatively and realistically engage the audience in the direct aesthetic experience of the nature of conflict these nurses encountered in practice. It can allow the voices of nurses who participated in this research study to be directly experienced in the conference setting. The dramatic monologue is best performed in front of an audience, but could be recorded if presentation restrictions necessitated this accommodation.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:11:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:11:34Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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