Well-Being, Coping Resources, and Their Correlates in Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149888
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Well-Being, Coping Resources, and Their Correlates in Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
Abstract:
Well-Being, Coping Resources, and Their Correlates in Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Wall, Mary Patricia, PhD, RN, BC
P.I. Institution Name:University of Maryland School of Nursing
Purpose: These secondary analyses examine the relationships between well-being and coping resource variables and demographic and patient variables in community-dwelling people with COPD. The original study examined predictors of functional performance in this population. Method: Participants were recruited from a suburban pulmonary medicine practice. A total of 119 people (68.17 ± 8.48 years, 53.8% male, 99% Caucasian) completed the study protocol. Well-being variables in this study were anxiety, depression, life satisfaction, and happiness. Perceived social support and mastery were the coping resource variables. The demographic and patient variables of interest were overall health, home oxygen use, smoking history, age, gender, ethnicity and race, marital status, education, and employment. Findings: Increasing anxiety was correlated to poorer overall health (Kendall's tau-b = -.177) and being female (r = .247). Increasing depression was correlated to poorer overall health, use of oxygen at home, and smoking history (Kendall's tau-b = -.341, .227, and .165, respectively). Life satisfaction was correlated to poorer overall health and use of home oxygen (Kendall's tau-b = -.315, and .188, respectively). Happiness was correlated to poorer overall health, smoking, and employment (Kendall's tau-b = -.252, .187, and -.171, respectively) and to age (r = -.207). Social support was correlated to overall health (Kendall's tau-b = .141). Mastery was correlated to overall health (Kendall's tau-b = .270) and education (r = .143). Race and ethnicity were unrelated to any of the well-being and coping resource variables. All correlations presented were significant at p Conclusions: The significant relationships between overall health and all the well-being and coping resource variables are not surprising, and in the expected directions. Women and patients requiring home oxygen therapy may require more vigilant screening for anxiety and depression than other COPD sub-groups. Those with more formal education reported greater mastery (control) over their situation.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWell-Being, Coping Resources, and Their Correlates in Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Diseaseen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149888-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Well-Being, Coping Resources, and Their Correlates in Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Wall, Mary Patricia, PhD, RN, BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Maryland School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mwall@umaryland.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: These secondary analyses examine the relationships between well-being and coping resource variables and demographic and patient variables in community-dwelling people with COPD. The original study examined predictors of functional performance in this population. Method: Participants were recruited from a suburban pulmonary medicine practice. A total of 119 people (68.17 &plusmn; 8.48 years, 53.8% male, 99% Caucasian) completed the study protocol. Well-being variables in this study were anxiety, depression, life satisfaction, and happiness. Perceived social support and mastery were the coping resource variables. The demographic and patient variables of interest were overall health, home oxygen use, smoking history, age, gender, ethnicity and race, marital status, education, and employment. Findings: Increasing anxiety was correlated to poorer overall health (Kendall's tau-b = -.177) and being female (r = .247). Increasing depression was correlated to poorer overall health, use of oxygen at home, and smoking history (Kendall's tau-b = -.341, .227, and .165, respectively). Life satisfaction was correlated to poorer overall health and use of home oxygen (Kendall's tau-b = -.315, and .188, respectively). Happiness was correlated to poorer overall health, smoking, and employment (Kendall's tau-b = -.252, .187, and -.171, respectively) and to age (r = -.207). Social support was correlated to overall health (Kendall's tau-b = .141). Mastery was correlated to overall health (Kendall's tau-b = .270) and education (r = .143). Race and ethnicity were unrelated to any of the well-being and coping resource variables. All correlations presented were significant at p Conclusions: The significant relationships between overall health and all the well-being and coping resource variables are not surprising, and in the expected directions. Women and patients requiring home oxygen therapy may require more vigilant screening for anxiety and depression than other COPD sub-groups. Those with more formal education reported greater mastery (control) over their situation.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:11:47Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:11:47Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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