Family Experiences During Resuscitation at a Children's Emergency Department

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149897
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Family Experiences During Resuscitation at a Children's Emergency Department
Abstract:
Family Experiences During Resuscitation at a Children's Emergency Department
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Young, Anne, RN, EdD
P.I. Institution Name:Texas Woman's University
Co-Authors:Patricia R. McGahey-Oakland, RN, MSN, PCCNP, APRN-BC; Holly Lieder, RN, MSN, CPNP
FAMILY EXPERIENCES DURING RESUSCITATION AT A CHILDREN'S EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT Purpose and Significance: Although family presence during cardiac resuscitation is gaining new emphasis in emergency departments, no studies specifically address family presence in pediatric populations. Because of their vulnerability and inability to care for themselves, children represent a unique group. To facilitate development of a policy regarding family presence during resuscitation in a pediatric setting, study objectives included: (1) Describe experiences of family members whose children underwent resuscitation; (2) Identify essential information about how to improve experiences for family members; and (3) Assess mental and health functioning of parents/guardians following their child's resuscitation. Research Design and Methods: In this descriptive, retrospective study, family members were interviewed using the Family Presence during Resuscitation/ Invasive Procedures Questionnaire; Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI-18); Post Traumatic Stress Disorder Questionnaire (PTSD); and the Short Form Health Survey v 2 (SF12v2) Audio-taped interviews ? in either English or Spanish ? lasted approximately one hour. Results: Ten interviews were completed with seven mothers, two fathers, and one grandmother. Seven were present during resuscitation. All participants felt the chance to be present was important. Family members indicated that (1) it was their right; (2) the parental connection was important; (3) seeing is believing; (4) experience counted when negotiating to remain in the resuscitation area (5) questions came later, and (6) organ donation requests required sensitivity. Conclusions: Whether planned or not, parents are more commonly becoming part of the resuscitation process. Institutions can facilitate this process by being prepared to support family members desiring to be present. This study was funded by a grant from the Parry Chair for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention at Texas Woman's University.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFamily Experiences During Resuscitation at a Children's Emergency Departmenten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149897-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Family Experiences During Resuscitation at a Children's Emergency Department</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Young, Anne, RN, EdD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Texas Woman's University</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">eyoung@mail.twu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Patricia R. McGahey-Oakland, RN, MSN, PCCNP, APRN-BC; Holly Lieder, RN, MSN, CPNP</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">FAMILY EXPERIENCES DURING RESUSCITATION AT A CHILDREN'S EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT Purpose and Significance: Although family presence during cardiac resuscitation is gaining new emphasis in emergency departments, no studies specifically address family presence in pediatric populations. Because of their vulnerability and inability to care for themselves, children represent a unique group. To facilitate development of a policy regarding family presence during resuscitation in a pediatric setting, study objectives included: (1) Describe experiences of family members whose children underwent resuscitation; (2) Identify essential information about how to improve experiences for family members; and (3) Assess mental and health functioning of parents/guardians following their child's resuscitation. Research Design and Methods: In this descriptive, retrospective study, family members were interviewed using the Family Presence during Resuscitation/ Invasive Procedures Questionnaire; Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI-18); Post Traumatic Stress Disorder Questionnaire (PTSD); and the Short Form Health Survey v 2 (SF12v2) Audio-taped interviews ? in either English or Spanish ? lasted approximately one hour. Results: Ten interviews were completed with seven mothers, two fathers, and one grandmother. Seven were present during resuscitation. All participants felt the chance to be present was important. Family members indicated that (1) it was their right; (2) the parental connection was important; (3) seeing is believing; (4) experience counted when negotiating to remain in the resuscitation area (5) questions came later, and (6) organ donation requests required sensitivity. Conclusions: Whether planned or not, parents are more commonly becoming part of the resuscitation process. Institutions can facilitate this process by being prepared to support family members desiring to be present. This study was funded by a grant from the Parry Chair for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention at Texas Woman's University.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:11:59Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:11:59Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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