Parental Pain Assessment and Management Practices at Home Following an Injury

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149898
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Parental Pain Assessment and Management Practices at Home Following an Injury
Abstract:
Parental Pain Assessment and Management Practices at Home Following an Injury
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Zisk, Rachel Yaffa, PhD, RN, MPH
P.I. Institution Name:Yale University, School of Nursing
Title:Postdoctoral Fellow
Purpose: The majority of children's pain is assessed and managed by their parents, but there is meager literature regarding these practices. Parents are aware of their child's usual behavior patterns and are thought to base their detection and management of the child's pain on changes in those patterns. Fractured limbs or clavicles due to accidental injury exemplify a common childhood pain experience where much of the pain assessment and management is carried out at home. Primarily this study examined the influence of parental perception of children's acute pain behaviors on acute pain management practices. Secondarily the study examined the influence of parental perception of children's usual behavioral style on parental pain assessment and management practices. Methods: This study employed a prospective design to explore parents' assessment and management practices (pharmacological and non-pharmacological) at home following treatment in the emergency department for a fractured limb or clavicle. The participants included 50 parents of children aged 5-10 years. Analysis of the data included descriptive statistics, correlations, odds ratios, non-parametric tests, and regressions. Results: The results demonstrated that: parents provide their children with very few doses of analgesia, although most children experienced significant pain during the first two days; children's usual behavioral style influenced the changes in behaviors exhibited as a result of pain, yet did not influence parental management practices; and parents utilize many non-pharmacological pain alleviation methods which they report as being as helpful or more helpful than analgesia. Conclusions and Implications: The findings demonstrate that parents, though attuned to their children, may benefit from interventions that enhance pain management practices at home. Future interventions should be designed to assist parents in recognizing cues children exhibit when in pain, and comprehensive instructions of how to manage pain in an age-appropriate manner and how to use individually appropriate methods.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleParental Pain Assessment and Management Practices at Home Following an Injuryen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149898-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Parental Pain Assessment and Management Practices at Home Following an Injury</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Zisk, Rachel Yaffa, PhD, RN, MPH</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Yale University, School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Postdoctoral Fellow</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">rachel.zisk@yale.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The majority of children's pain is assessed and managed by their parents, but there is meager literature regarding these practices. Parents are aware of their child's usual behavior patterns and are thought to base their detection and management of the child's pain on changes in those patterns. Fractured limbs or clavicles due to accidental injury exemplify a common childhood pain experience where much of the pain assessment and management is carried out at home. Primarily this study examined the influence of parental perception of children's acute pain behaviors on acute pain management practices. Secondarily the study examined the influence of parental perception of children's usual behavioral style on parental pain assessment and management practices. Methods: This study employed a prospective design to explore parents' assessment and management practices (pharmacological and non-pharmacological) at home following treatment in the emergency department for a fractured limb or clavicle. The participants included 50 parents of children aged 5-10 years. Analysis of the data included descriptive statistics, correlations, odds ratios, non-parametric tests, and regressions. Results: The results demonstrated that: parents provide their children with very few doses of analgesia, although most children experienced significant pain during the first two days; children's usual behavioral style influenced the changes in behaviors exhibited as a result of pain, yet did not influence parental management practices; and parents utilize many non-pharmacological pain alleviation methods which they report as being as helpful or more helpful than analgesia. Conclusions and Implications: The findings demonstrate that parents, though attuned to their children, may benefit from interventions that enhance pain management practices at home. Future interventions should be designed to assist parents in recognizing cues children exhibit when in pain, and comprehensive instructions of how to manage pain in an age-appropriate manner and how to use individually appropriate methods.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:12:00Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:12:00Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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