2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149914
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Mailed Survey Research: Advantages and Challenges
Abstract:
Mailed Survey Research: Advantages and Challenges
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Biedrzycki, Barbara Anne, RN, CRNP, AOCN
P.I. Institution Name:Johns Hopkins University
Title:Nurse practitioner
[Clinical session research presentation] Participation in decision making about treatment options in advanced disease is included in many of advanced directives forms. Advance directives decision making is a critical factor in facilitating communication within families and contributes to quality end of life care. The Health Belief Model provides the theoretical framework that guides this pilot study. The value that one places on the risks and benefits of the health outcome, as well as the completion of an advance directive, determines if action is taken. Through two educational projects, including a poster presentation at a national nursing conference and one-on-one interactions at a continuing education program, this pilot study captured data. Data was gathered regarding nurses' own use of advance directives and their thoughts on whether resources or information impacted the use of advance directives. Research participants were given sample copies of advance directives and had the opportunity for individual counseling. The educational objective was to increase the nurse's awareness about advance directives. Perhaps if nurses are more aware they will write their own advance directives. Educating family and friends first may help nurses feel more comfortable in helping patients plan for end of life care, a topic that may be sensitive and uncomfortable for patients and health care providers alike. The data supports that nurses are willing to share that they do not have advance directives. Knowledge of and access to resources to complete advance directives does not appear to impact the nurse's personal decision regarding having an advance directive. While the main purpose of the previous educational projects was to increase nurses' awareness of advance directives, valuable pilot data was gathered. This very preliminary data provides the impetus for conducting a more rigorous research study exploring nurses' use of advance directives.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMailed Survey Research: Advantages and Challengesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149914-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Mailed Survey Research: Advantages and Challenges</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Biedrzycki, Barbara Anne, RN, CRNP, AOCN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Johns Hopkins University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nurse practitioner</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">NPBiedrzycki@aol.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Clinical session research presentation] Participation in decision making about treatment options in advanced disease is included in many of advanced directives forms. Advance directives decision making is a critical factor in facilitating communication within families and contributes to quality end of life care. The Health Belief Model provides the theoretical framework that guides this pilot study. The value that one places on the risks and benefits of the health outcome, as well as the completion of an advance directive, determines if action is taken. Through two educational projects, including a poster presentation at a national nursing conference and one-on-one interactions at a continuing education program, this pilot study captured data. Data was gathered regarding nurses' own use of advance directives and their thoughts on whether resources or information impacted the use of advance directives. Research participants were given sample copies of advance directives and had the opportunity for individual counseling. The educational objective was to increase the nurse's awareness about advance directives. Perhaps if nurses are more aware they will write their own advance directives. Educating family and friends first may help nurses feel more comfortable in helping patients plan for end of life care, a topic that may be sensitive and uncomfortable for patients and health care providers alike. The data supports that nurses are willing to share that they do not have advance directives. Knowledge of and access to resources to complete advance directives does not appear to impact the nurse's personal decision regarding having an advance directive. While the main purpose of the previous educational projects was to increase nurses' awareness of advance directives, valuable pilot data was gathered. This very preliminary data provides the impetus for conducting a more rigorous research study exploring nurses' use of advance directives.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:12:22Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:12:22Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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