Collaborative Partnership between Medical and Nursing Faculty Utilizing Standardized Patients

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149917
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Collaborative Partnership between Medical and Nursing Faculty Utilizing Standardized Patients
Abstract:
Collaborative Partnership between Medical and Nursing Faculty Utilizing Standardized Patients
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Bowen, Mary E., CRNP, DNS, JD, CNAA
P.I. Institution Name:Thomas Jefferson University
Title:Associate Professor, Vice Chair, Nursing
Co-Authors:Kathleen Jackson, CRNP, MSN
[Clinical session research presentation] Purpose: A systems model of collaboration was utilized to create a power-sharing partnership between the Nursing School Faculty and Medical School Faculty for teaching physical assessment to NP students. Standardized patients (SPs), human resources, and classrooms used by the medical college for teaching second year medical students assessments are being used for teaching, evaluation and assessment of NP students. Methodology of intervention: A systems model of collaboration developed in this collaborative teaching effort. A transforming 1) Educational Process utilizing 2) medical and nursing faculty partners, created a power-sharing Partnership, for 3) improved Practice Outcomes in NP students. Implementation: Nursing faculty desired quality education for NP students in health assessment classes.  This required supportive educational leadership within the larger University system for the collaboration between the medical college and the nursing school faculty.  Sufficient human resources and a commitment to collaborate are necessary for a successful outcome. Education strategy: Nursing faculty found that advantages of standardized patients are: validity, reliability, availability, controllability, adaptability, no risk, immediate and constructive feedback from SPs. The SP will not vary from student to student.  Nurse Practitioner students are receiving same assessment education as the medical student in the class room.  Standardized patients evaluate the NP students and are utilized for teaching assessment skills. The SP completes a comprehensive checklist of each skill completed by the student. Evaluation: This collaborative partnership in the use of SPs from the medical college represents a partnership between medical college faculty and nursing faculty in providing cost effective, realistic instruction. Ninety seven percent of medical colleges use SPs for instruction, 85% for assessment, 72% for advancement and progression, and 49% for a final comprehensive examination.  This collaboration has provided congruency between medical education and nursing education and has improved clinical performance of NP students.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCollaborative Partnership between Medical and Nursing Faculty Utilizing Standardized Patientsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149917-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Collaborative Partnership between Medical and Nursing Faculty Utilizing Standardized Patients</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Bowen, Mary E., CRNP, DNS, JD, CNAA</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Thomas Jefferson University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor, Vice Chair, Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mary.bowen@jefferson.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Kathleen Jackson, CRNP, MSN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Clinical session research presentation] Purpose: A systems model of collaboration was utilized to create a power-sharing partnership between the Nursing School Faculty and Medical School Faculty for teaching physical assessment to NP students. Standardized patients (SPs), human resources, and classrooms used by the medical college for teaching second year medical students assessments are being used for teaching, evaluation and assessment of NP students. Methodology of intervention: A systems model of collaboration developed in this collaborative teaching effort. A transforming 1) Educational Process utilizing 2) medical and nursing faculty partners, created a power-sharing Partnership, for 3) improved Practice Outcomes in NP students. Implementation: Nursing faculty desired quality education for NP students in health assessment classes.&nbsp; This required supportive educational leadership within the larger University system for the collaboration between the medical college and the nursing school faculty.&nbsp; Sufficient human resources and a commitment to collaborate are necessary for a successful outcome. Education strategy: Nursing faculty found that advantages of standardized patients are: validity, reliability, availability, controllability, adaptability, no risk, immediate and constructive feedback from SPs.&nbsp;The SP will not vary from student to student.&nbsp; Nurse Practitioner students are receiving same assessment education as the medical student in the class room.&nbsp; Standardized patients evaluate the NP students and are utilized for teaching assessment skills. The SP completes a comprehensive checklist of each skill completed by the student. Evaluation: This collaborative partnership in the use of SPs from the medical college represents a partnership between medical college faculty and nursing faculty in providing cost effective, realistic instruction. Ninety seven percent of medical colleges use SPs for instruction, 85% for assessment, 72% for advancement and progression, and 49% for a final comprehensive examination.&nbsp; This collaboration has provided congruency between medical education and nursing education and has improved clinical performance of NP students.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:12:26Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:12:26Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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