Methodological Issues in the Cross-Cultural Measurement of Psychosocial Variables in Latino Populations

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149930
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Methodological Issues in the Cross-Cultural Measurement of Psychosocial Variables in Latino Populations
Abstract:
Methodological Issues in the Cross-Cultural Measurement of Psychosocial Variables in Latino Populations
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Caplan, Susan
P.I. Institution Name:Yale University
Title:PhD student
[Leadership session research presentation] The objective of this paper is to examine methodological issues in the measurement of psychosocial constructs in Latino populations. People of Hispanic origin (Latinos) are the largest minority group in the United States, representing between 13.3 % and 15% of the population, or one in eight people (Pew Hispanic Center, 2006). By 2030, it is predicted that Latinos will make up 20% of the United States population (U.S. Census Bureau, 2004). In spite of their growing numbers there is limited information on the health needs of this heterogeneous group due to the infrequent use of validated Spanish language instruments. This presentation will include an overview of the conceptualization of cross-cultural methodology, and the methods used to establish cross-cultural equivalence and validity of instruments. Cultural differences can affect the psychometric properties of instruments used to measure psychosocial constructs; however, many instruments have been standardized on the American mainstream populations with little understanding of cultural factors that might affect their validity. There is a common assumption that abstract psychosocial constructs are easily transferable cross-culturally (Azocar, Arean, Miranda, & Munoz, 2001; Rogler, 1999). This assumption results in cultural biases that affect the validity of the instruments used to measure psychosocial constructs. This presentation will review the criteria for evaluating the cultural equivalence of a foreign language instrument. These criteria include: content validity; semantic equivalence; measurement, scalar or technical equivalence; conceptual or construct validity and criterion validity (Canino, Lewis-Fernandez & Bravo, 1997; Crockett, Randall, Shen & Driscoll, 2005). Use of thoroughly validated Spanish language instruments will help nurses understand the health needs of Latino immigrants and to start to distinguish between Latino subethnicities. This will aid in the development of appropriately tailored treatments and the provision of culturally competent care.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMethodological Issues in the Cross-Cultural Measurement of Psychosocial Variables in Latino Populationsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149930-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Methodological Issues in the Cross-Cultural Measurement of Psychosocial Variables in Latino Populations</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Caplan, Susan</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Yale University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">PhD student</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">susan.caplan@yale.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Leadership session research presentation] The objective of this paper is to examine methodological issues in the measurement of psychosocial constructs in Latino populations. People of Hispanic origin (Latinos) are the largest minority group in the United States, representing between 13.3 % and 15% of the population, or one in eight people (Pew Hispanic Center, 2006). By 2030, it is predicted that Latinos will make up 20% of the United States population (U.S. Census Bureau, 2004). In spite of their growing numbers there is limited information on the health needs of this heterogeneous group due to the infrequent use of validated Spanish language instruments. This presentation will include an overview of the conceptualization of cross-cultural methodology, and the methods used to establish cross-cultural equivalence and validity of instruments. Cultural differences can affect the psychometric properties of instruments used to measure psychosocial constructs; however, many instruments have been standardized on the American mainstream populations with little understanding of cultural factors that might affect their validity. There is a common assumption that abstract psychosocial constructs are easily transferable cross-culturally (Azocar, Arean, Miranda, &amp; Munoz, 2001; Rogler, 1999). This assumption results in cultural biases that affect the validity of the instruments used to measure psychosocial constructs. This presentation will review the criteria for evaluating the cultural equivalence of a foreign language instrument. These criteria include: content validity; semantic equivalence; measurement, scalar or technical equivalence; conceptual or construct validity and criterion validity (Canino, Lewis-Fernandez &amp; Bravo, 1997; Crockett, Randall, Shen &amp; Driscoll, 2005). Use of thoroughly validated Spanish language instruments will help nurses understand the health needs of Latino immigrants and to start to distinguish between Latino subethnicities. This will aid in the development of appropriately tailored treatments and the provision of culturally competent care.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:12:42Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:12:42Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.