Identifying Factors that Account for Disparity of Graduation Rates

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149935
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Identifying Factors that Account for Disparity of Graduation Rates
Abstract:
Identifying Factors that Account for Disparity of Graduation Rates
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:Tart, Kathryn, EdD
P.I. Institution Name:Texas Woman's University
Title:Assistant Professor and Baccalaureate Coordinator
Co-Authors:Lucille Travis, PhD, RN, CNA; Carolyn Adamson, PhD
Purpose: Of 98 students admitted in 1997, 49% were minority students. The failure rate among minority students was 35.4%, compared to 4% among their majority peers. Successful completion of the program by minority students was 50.8%. Therefore, as the initial stage of developing a program to increase the retention of diverse baccalaureate nursing students, early indicators of academic risk were sought using a reading and math diagnostic assessment tool, the Nurses Entrance Test (NET). Design: At a large university-based nursing program in the southern U.S. a group of students (n=53) was tracked from admission to an upper-division generic nursing program, through graduation and completion of the NCLEX examination, or to withdrawal from the program (1998 to 2001). All newly admitted students completed the NET and a demographic data record. Any student with a reading comprehension score of 54, or below, was given the opportunity to voluntarily participate in tutoring activities during their first fall and spring semesters in the nursing program. Findings: Seventeen students (32%) scored 54 or below on the reading comprehension component of the NET. Of all students, upon completion of the two years of upper division classes, 38 (72%) graduated, whereas 15 (28%) did not. Of the 15 students who did not graduate, a significant number, 10 (68%) had scored 54 or below on the reading comprehension portion of the NET (chi square =11.49, sig. =0.001). Furthermore, when success on the NCLEX was examined, 50% of the failures had also scored 54 or below. English as a second language was not related to graduation, but ethnic minority was. Attrition rates were 50% for Blacks and Hispanics, 33% for Asians/Pacific Islanders, and 5% for Whites. Many of the students with low reading comprehension scores declined the opportunity to participate in the tutoring.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIdentifying Factors that Account for Disparity of Graduation Ratesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149935-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Identifying Factors that Account for Disparity of Graduation Rates</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Tart, Kathryn, EdD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Texas Woman's University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor and Baccalaureate Coordinator</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ktart@twu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Lucille Travis, PhD, RN, CNA; Carolyn Adamson, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Of 98 students admitted in 1997, 49% were minority students. The failure rate among minority students was 35.4%, compared to 4% among their majority peers. Successful completion of the program by minority students was 50.8%. Therefore, as the initial stage of developing a program to increase the retention of diverse baccalaureate nursing students, early indicators of academic risk were sought using a reading and math diagnostic assessment tool, the Nurses Entrance Test (NET). Design: At a large university-based nursing program in the southern U.S. a group of students (n=53) was tracked from admission to an upper-division generic nursing program, through graduation and completion of the NCLEX examination, or to withdrawal from the program (1998 to 2001). All newly admitted students completed the NET and a demographic data record. Any student with a reading comprehension score of 54, or below, was given the opportunity to voluntarily participate in tutoring activities during their first fall and spring semesters in the nursing program. Findings: Seventeen students (32%) scored 54 or below on the reading comprehension component of the NET. Of all students, upon completion of the two years of upper division classes, 38 (72%) graduated, whereas 15 (28%) did not. Of the 15 students who did not graduate, a significant number, 10 (68%) had scored 54 or below on the reading comprehension portion of the NET (chi square =11.49, sig. =0.001). Furthermore, when success on the NCLEX was examined, 50% of the failures had also scored 54 or below. English as a second language was not related to graduation, but ethnic minority was. Attrition rates were 50% for Blacks and Hispanics, 33% for Asians/Pacific Islanders, and 5% for Whites. Many of the students with low reading comprehension scores declined the opportunity to participate in the tutoring.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:12:49Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:12:49Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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