The Effects of Spousal Relationships on Nausea and Vomiting in Pregnancy

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149944
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Effects of Spousal Relationships on Nausea and Vomiting in Pregnancy
Abstract:
The Effects of Spousal Relationships on Nausea and Vomiting in Pregnancy
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:Vari, Patty M., MS, RN, IBCLC
P.I. Institution Name:University of North Dakota
Title:Clinical Assistant Professor
Co-Authors:Glenda N. Lindseth, PhD, RN, CNS
The Effects of Spousal Relationships on Nausea and Vomiting in Pregnancy Objective: Fifty to 80% of pregnant women can be expected to experience nausea and vomiting during pregnancy. Yet, a cause of this phenomenon is relatively unknown. The notion that psychosocial relationships may be related to nausea and vomiting in pregnancy (NVP) has been relatively ignored in studies on NVP. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to examine the effects of spousal (mate) relationships on nausea and vomiting experiences of women in pregnancy. Design: This is an ongoing descriptive-correlational study of 134 pregnant women at risk for experiencing nausea and vomiting in pregnancy. Population Sample: The sample population is comprised of ethnically-diverse northern plains pregnant women targeted for study at 26-30 weeks gestation. Consenting 18 to 40 year-old pregnant women referred by primary health care providers are being systematically selected for entry into the study. Variables Studied Together: This study will test the hypothesis that there will be significantly less nausea and vomiting in positive spousal relationships. Demographic, spousal relationship, and self-care agency variables will be analyzed for relationships to nausea and vomiting experiences through use of descriptive statistics and multiple regression analyses. Methods: Orem’s Theory of Self-Care will guide the study. Instruments used for measurement include a Demographic questionnaire, Rhode’s Nausea and Vomiting Symptom Distress Adaption Scale (alpha = .88), the Canadian Spousal Relationship tool, and Kearney and Fleischer’s Exercise of Self-care Agency Instrument (alpha = .80). Findings: Results of this study are in progress. Implications for Study: Nurses need to be aware of prenatal factors, such as spousal relationships, that may affect nausea and vomiting in pregnancy. This study was conducted as part of the NIH research grant # HD33991.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Effects of Spousal Relationships on Nausea and Vomiting in Pregnancyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149944-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Effects of Spousal Relationships on Nausea and Vomiting in Pregnancy</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Vari, Patty M., MS, RN, IBCLC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of North Dakota</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Clinical Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">patty_vari@mail.und.nodak.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Glenda N. Lindseth, PhD, RN, CNS</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The Effects of Spousal Relationships on Nausea and Vomiting in Pregnancy Objective: Fifty to 80% of pregnant women can be expected to experience nausea and vomiting during pregnancy. Yet, a cause of this phenomenon is relatively unknown. The notion that psychosocial relationships may be related to nausea and vomiting in pregnancy (NVP) has been relatively ignored in studies on NVP. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to examine the effects of spousal (mate) relationships on nausea and vomiting experiences of women in pregnancy. Design: This is an ongoing descriptive-correlational study of 134 pregnant women at risk for experiencing nausea and vomiting in pregnancy. Population Sample: The sample population is comprised of ethnically-diverse northern plains pregnant women targeted for study at 26-30 weeks gestation. Consenting 18 to 40 year-old pregnant women referred by primary health care providers are being systematically selected for entry into the study. Variables Studied Together: This study will test the hypothesis that there will be significantly less nausea and vomiting in positive spousal relationships. Demographic, spousal relationship, and self-care agency variables will be analyzed for relationships to nausea and vomiting experiences through use of descriptive statistics and multiple regression analyses. Methods: Orem&rsquo;s Theory of Self-Care will guide the study. Instruments used for measurement include a Demographic questionnaire, Rhode&rsquo;s Nausea and Vomiting Symptom Distress Adaption Scale (alpha = .88), the Canadian Spousal Relationship tool, and Kearney and Fleischer&rsquo;s Exercise of Self-care Agency Instrument (alpha = .80). Findings: Results of this study are in progress. Implications for Study: Nurses need to be aware of prenatal factors, such as spousal relationships, that may affect nausea and vomiting in pregnancy. This study was conducted as part of the NIH research grant # HD33991.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:13:01Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:13:01Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.