Assessing Impact of Problem-Based Learning on Learning Skills Profiles of Masters Students in Nursing Administration

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149969
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Assessing Impact of Problem-Based Learning on Learning Skills Profiles of Masters Students in Nursing Administration
Abstract:
Assessing Impact of Problem-Based Learning on Learning Skills Profiles of Masters Students in Nursing Administration
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Baker, Constance M., RN, EdD, MA
P.I. Institution Name:Indiana University
Title:Professor
Co-Authors:Mary L. Fisher, RN, PhD; Anna M. McDaniel, RN, DNS, FAAN; Daniel J. Pesut, RNCS, PhD, FAAN
Nursing administration faculties are revising graduate curricula to prepare nurse managers for today's market-driven healthcare delivery systems and the future's consolidated networks. Nurse managers need preparation in critical reasoning, seeking broad-based knowledge, structuring knowledge in clinical practice contexts, collaborating in interdisciplinary teams, using information technology, participating in continuous quality improvement, strengthening lifelong learning commitment, and exhibiting ethical behavior. Problem-based learning is offered as an appropriate pedagogy to prepare nurse managers for the uncertainties of future administrative practice. This presentation summarizes the key characteristics of problem-based learning (PBL), describes the MSN curricula revision, and outlines major PBL evaluation strategies. Specific research attention is given to assessing the relationship of PBL and the Learning Skills Profiles (LSP) of 26 Masters-level nursing students. The LSP scores are compared before the 4 PBL courses with LSP scores after the 4 PBL courses. Boyatzis and Kolb's Learning Skills Profile (LSP) was designed to measure four major job-related skill types: interpersonal, analytical, informational, and behavioral. A learning skill is situational and subject to intentional development. Respondents are asked to sort 72 learning skill cards twice, once into seven categories describing their personal skill level and a second time describing demands of their job. The LSP is congruent with experiential learning theory's two dimensions of concrete/abstract and active/reflective. Findings of the study include a description of the demographic data and LSP scores for the cohort of MSN students in each of the three years. Differences in LSP scores between before and after PBL courses are compared with Masters students in Business Administration. Outcomes of MSN student LSPs were used to focus administrative experiences in the required MSN practicum. Thus, LSP served as a means of evaluation and became diagnostic and prescriptive in crafting individual learning experiences.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAssessing Impact of Problem-Based Learning on Learning Skills Profiles of Masters Students in Nursing Administrationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149969-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Assessing Impact of Problem-Based Learning on Learning Skills Profiles of Masters Students in Nursing Administration</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Baker, Constance M., RN, EdD, MA</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Indiana University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cbaker1@iupui.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Mary L. Fisher, RN, PhD; Anna M. McDaniel, RN, DNS, FAAN; Daniel J. Pesut, RNCS, PhD, FAAN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Nursing administration faculties are revising graduate curricula to prepare nurse managers for today's market-driven healthcare delivery systems and the future's consolidated networks. Nurse managers need preparation in critical reasoning, seeking broad-based knowledge, structuring knowledge in clinical practice contexts, collaborating in interdisciplinary teams, using information technology, participating in continuous quality improvement, strengthening lifelong learning commitment, and exhibiting ethical behavior. Problem-based learning is offered as an appropriate pedagogy to prepare nurse managers for the uncertainties of future administrative practice. This presentation summarizes the key characteristics of problem-based learning (PBL), describes the MSN curricula revision, and outlines major PBL evaluation strategies. Specific research attention is given to assessing the relationship of PBL and the Learning Skills Profiles (LSP) of 26 Masters-level nursing students. The LSP scores are compared before the 4 PBL courses with LSP scores after the 4 PBL courses. Boyatzis and Kolb's Learning Skills Profile (LSP) was designed to measure four major job-related skill types: interpersonal, analytical, informational, and behavioral. A learning skill is situational and subject to intentional development. Respondents are asked to sort 72 learning skill cards twice, once into seven categories describing their personal skill level and a second time describing demands of their job. The LSP is congruent with experiential learning theory's two dimensions of concrete/abstract and active/reflective. Findings of the study include a description of the demographic data and LSP scores for the cohort of MSN students in each of the three years. Differences in LSP scores between before and after PBL courses are compared with Masters students in Business Administration. Outcomes of MSN student LSPs were used to focus administrative experiences in the required MSN practicum. Thus, LSP served as a means of evaluation and became diagnostic and prescriptive in crafting individual learning experiences.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:13:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:13:34Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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