The Legalities of Students' Use of Technology in Clinical Settings

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149973
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Legalities of Students' Use of Technology in Clinical Settings
Abstract:
The Legalities of Students' Use of Technology in Clinical Settings
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Bell, Pegge, PhD, ARNP-BC
P.I. Institution Name:Barry University
Title:Dean of Nursing, Barry University School of Nursing
Co-Authors:Patricia E. Thompson, EdD, RN, FAAN; Linda Calhoun, RN, MNSc
A recent survey by The Chronicles of Higher Education of legal counsels projects that over the course of the next five years, one of the most pressing legal issues will be the use of technology. With increased technological competence, students now find it useful to take their personal technology tools to the clinical setting. However, students' clinical actions put them in positions of having access to confidential information and their inappropriate use of modern technology can violate patients' confidentiality rights, and possibly the rights of faculty and other students. The current generation of nursing students is comfortable with technology and may be, in many cases, more technologically savvy than their faculty members. Without proper supervision, nursing students may inappropriately use cell phones to send visual images; palm pilots to access, store, and retrieve data; and small recorders to make audiotapes. With the goal of preparing safe, competent nurses who are accountable for their own actions, the clinical supervision of students must include attention to technology. Faculty need to understand the legal ramifications of using technology in the clinical setting so they can better educate and supervise their students.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Legalities of Students' Use of Technology in Clinical Settingsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149973-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Legalities of Students' Use of Technology in Clinical Settings</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Bell, Pegge, PhD, ARNP-BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Barry University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Dean of Nursing, Barry University School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">PBell@mail.barry.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Patricia E. Thompson, EdD, RN, FAAN; Linda Calhoun, RN, MNSc</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">A recent survey by The Chronicles of Higher Education of legal counsels projects that over the course of the next five years, one of the most pressing legal issues will be the use of technology. With increased technological competence, students now find it useful to take their personal technology tools to the clinical setting. However, students' clinical actions put them in positions of having access to confidential information and their inappropriate use of modern technology can violate patients' confidentiality rights, and possibly the rights of faculty and other students. The current generation of nursing students is comfortable with technology and may be, in many cases, more technologically savvy than their faculty members. Without proper supervision, nursing students may inappropriately use cell phones to send visual images; palm pilots to access, store, and retrieve data; and small recorders to make audiotapes. With the goal of preparing safe, competent nurses who are accountable for their own actions, the clinical supervision of students must include attention to technology. Faculty need to understand the legal ramifications of using technology in the clinical setting so they can better educate and supervise their students.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:13:39Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:13:39Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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