Something Old, Something New: An Examination of Cultural Competency in Nursing Practice

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149983
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Something Old, Something New: An Examination of Cultural Competency in Nursing Practice
Abstract:
Something Old, Something New: An Examination of Cultural Competency in Nursing Practice
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Brunk, Quincealea A., RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Valdosta State University
Title:Associate Professor
Nurse historians typically acknowledge the mid-nineteenth century as a crucial time in the development of modern nursing. Changing social contexts, industrialization, and wars pushed the development of nursing forward as a distinct profession with unique contributions to be made to patient care. To date, few attempts have been made to examine the data from mid-nineteenth century nursing efforts in light of current issues or frameworks that can be substantiated with historical descriptions. Cultural competency in nursing practice is one of the issues that has taken the stage over the last two decades, evolving as a professional mandate for the delivery of quality patient care to a multicultural global community. A biographical case study, social history approach was used to examine the experiences of fourteen women who served as nurses during the Civil War (the earliest development of organized nursing in the United States). The research utilized primary and secondary sources at the Library of Congress, the National Archives, several State Historical Societies, and various University Library Collections. Primary sources included original handwritten letters, diaries, and memoirs by some of the nurses or their family members. Other primary sources included original documents from government organizations, newspapers, photographs, and published diaries or memoirs. Secondary sources included printed biographical information and modern nursing histories. Findings of this project indicate that many concepts that have taken center stage during the last quarter century can, in fact, be found in historical sources. Although the context was different than the present global community, the concept of cultural competency was present in the care that mid-nineteenth century nurses delivered. Application of frameworks that define cultural competency in today's health care arena will be presented as they existed during the Civil War era in America.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSomething Old, Something New: An Examination of Cultural Competency in Nursing Practiceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149983-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Something Old, Something New: An Examination of Cultural Competency in Nursing Practice</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Brunk, Quincealea A., RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Valdosta State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">qbrunk@valdosta.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Nurse historians typically acknowledge the mid-nineteenth century as a crucial time in the development of modern nursing. Changing social contexts, industrialization, and wars pushed the development of nursing forward as a distinct profession with unique contributions to be made to patient care. To date, few attempts have been made to examine the data from mid-nineteenth century nursing efforts in light of current issues or frameworks that can be substantiated with historical descriptions. Cultural competency in nursing practice is one of the issues that has taken the stage over the last two decades, evolving as a professional mandate for the delivery of quality patient care to a multicultural global community. A biographical case study, social history approach was used to examine the experiences of fourteen women who served as nurses during the Civil War (the earliest development of organized nursing in the United States). The research utilized primary and secondary sources at the Library of Congress, the National Archives, several State Historical Societies, and various University Library Collections. Primary sources included original handwritten letters, diaries, and memoirs by some of the nurses or their family members. Other primary sources included original documents from government organizations, newspapers, photographs, and published diaries or memoirs. Secondary sources included printed biographical information and modern nursing histories. Findings of this project indicate that many concepts that have taken center stage during the last quarter century can, in fact, be found in historical sources. Although the context was different than the present global community, the concept of cultural competency was present in the care that mid-nineteenth century nurses delivered. Application of frameworks that define cultural competency in today's health care arena will be presented as they existed during the Civil War era in America.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:13:52Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:13:52Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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