2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149987
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Spiritual Aspects of Palliative Care
Abstract:
Spiritual Aspects of Palliative Care
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Cavendish, Roberta C., PhD, RN, CPN
P.I. Institution Name:The College of Staten Island, City University of New York
Title:Associate Professor
Purpose: This purpose of this presentation is to facilitate the application of nursing knowledge of the spiritual aspects of palliative care by nurses and allied health care team members. A recent Gallup survey showed that people overwhelmingly want to reclaim and reassert the spiritual dimension of their life when dying. Research-based Practice Guidelines: Research findings indicate that nurses are reluctant and uncomfortable with the spiritual aspects of care although patients expect it and the healing process may be affected. Nurses recognize that spiritual assessments and interventions are within the scope of practice. Since spirituality's range of expression is infinite, some expressions lend themselves to examination better than others. Nurses cannot practice what they do not know. Spiritual care can be learned. Spiritual care must be accurate. The differentiation between spirituality and religion is core to the discussion. Through the application of Parse's (1992) Theory of Human Becoming to end on life care, the nurse guides a patient's search for meaning of a given health situation, and provides spiritual interventions that facilitate the patient's process of transcendence. Perceived barriers to spiritual care are addressed. Spiritual care tasks relevant to palliative care and patients' spiritual needs that include a belief system, connectedness, involvement, to finish business, and a positive outlook are addressed. Participants will be able to identify patient cues for accurate interventions. The research based spiritual care interventions that are complimentary therapies are presented. Conclusions: The spiritual aspects of palliative care are best supported through an interdisciplinary team approach. That the provision of spiritual care involves the spirituality of both the nurse and the patient and is transformational for both is stressed. The goal of spiritual care is to help patients transcend their circumstances and achieve a harmony and integrity that enriches the quality of life at the end-of-life.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSpiritual Aspects of Palliative Careen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149987-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Spiritual Aspects of Palliative Care</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Cavendish, Roberta C., PhD, RN, CPN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">The College of Staten Island, City University of New York</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">RCavendish@prodigy.net</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: This purpose of this presentation is to facilitate the application of nursing knowledge of the spiritual aspects of palliative care by nurses and allied health care team members. A recent Gallup survey showed that people overwhelmingly want to reclaim and reassert the spiritual dimension of their life when dying. Research-based Practice Guidelines: Research findings indicate that nurses are reluctant and uncomfortable with the spiritual aspects of care although patients expect it and the healing process may be affected. Nurses recognize that spiritual assessments and interventions are within the scope of practice. Since spirituality's range of expression is infinite, some expressions lend themselves to examination better than others. Nurses cannot practice what they do not know. Spiritual care can be learned. Spiritual care must be accurate. The differentiation between spirituality and religion is core to the discussion. Through the application of Parse's (1992) Theory of Human Becoming to end on life care, the nurse guides a patient's search for meaning of a given health situation, and provides spiritual interventions that facilitate the patient's process of transcendence. Perceived barriers to spiritual care are addressed. Spiritual care tasks relevant to palliative care and patients' spiritual needs that include a belief system, connectedness, involvement, to finish business, and a positive outlook are addressed. Participants will be able to identify patient cues for accurate interventions. The research based spiritual care interventions that are complimentary therapies are presented. Conclusions: The spiritual aspects of palliative care are best supported through an interdisciplinary team approach. That the provision of spiritual care involves the spirituality of both the nurse and the patient and is transformational for both is stressed. The goal of spiritual care is to help patients transcend their circumstances and achieve a harmony and integrity that enriches the quality of life at the end-of-life.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:13:57Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:13:57Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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