2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149992
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Self-Care for Nurses Who Experience Grief
Abstract:
Self-Care for Nurses Who Experience Grief
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Copeland, Sandra, RN, BC, MSN
P.I. Institution Name:Medical Center of Central Georgia
Title:Clinical Nurse Specialist
Co-Authors:Patricia C. Hill, RN, BC, MSN
Nurses experience high rates of professional burnout when working in oncology environments but we, as a profession tend to ignore the stresses that our personal grief brings to us. Nurses experience the same stages of Kubler-Ross's stages of grief when they lose a loved one, go through a traumatic divorce, or any other stressful separation. Several studies in palliative care have identified that nurses often don't even recognize when they are experiencing grief. That makes it hard to initiate self-care when recognition that a problem exists hasn't even occurred. Self-caring is the fuel that restores nurses' unique ability to continue to meet the complex needs of their personal and professional life. Nurses need to separate and balance their professional and personal lives. This becomes difficult when nurses in the stages of grief try to care for patients or families. In the initial phases of the grief process, it is not unusual for memory lapses, delayed response time, apathy, and anger to be manifested. This can translate to medical errors, loss of productivity and morale, patient safety concerns, and even an emotional or psychological crisis for the nurse. Eventually, the nurses will be able to use his/her grief experience to enhance patient care and return to a healthy perspective of their own personal life. Using creative self-care strategies like catharsis through submitting the grief experience for publication in nursing communities so others may benefit, becoming a member of the Palliative care team, forming bereavement outlet activities, and even grief anniversary celebrations or ?roasts? may help to heal the grieving nurse and benefit the profession as a whole while improving patient care.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSelf-Care for Nurses Who Experience Griefen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149992-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Self-Care for Nurses Who Experience Grief</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Copeland, Sandra, RN, BC, MSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Medical Center of Central Georgia</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Clinical Nurse Specialist</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">sandra.Copeland@gcsu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Patricia C. Hill, RN, BC, MSN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Nurses experience high rates of professional burnout when working in oncology environments but we, as a profession tend to ignore the stresses that our personal grief brings to us. Nurses experience the same stages of Kubler-Ross's stages of grief when they lose a loved one, go through a traumatic divorce, or any other stressful separation. Several studies in palliative care have identified that nurses often don't even recognize when they are experiencing grief. That makes it hard to initiate self-care when recognition that a problem exists hasn't even occurred. Self-caring is the fuel that restores nurses' unique ability to continue to meet the complex needs of their personal and professional life. Nurses need to separate and balance their professional and personal lives. This becomes difficult when nurses in the stages of grief try to care for patients or families. In the initial phases of the grief process, it is not unusual for memory lapses, delayed response time, apathy, and anger to be manifested. This can translate to medical errors, loss of productivity and morale, patient safety concerns, and even an emotional or psychological crisis for the nurse. Eventually, the nurses will be able to use his/her grief experience to enhance patient care and return to a healthy perspective of their own personal life. Using creative self-care strategies like catharsis through submitting the grief experience for publication in nursing communities so others may benefit, becoming a member of the Palliative care team, forming bereavement outlet activities, and even grief anniversary celebrations or ?roasts? may help to heal the grieving nurse and benefit the profession as a whole while improving patient care.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:14:04Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:14:04Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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