Factors Affecting Recovery Following Multiple Caregiving Activities with Preterm Infants

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150005
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Factors Affecting Recovery Following Multiple Caregiving Activities with Preterm Infants
Abstract:
Factors Affecting Recovery Following Multiple Caregiving Activities with Preterm Infants
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Evans, Jane C., PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Medical College of Ohio
Title:Professor and Director, Center for Nursing Research and Evaluation
Co-Authors:Eliza McCartney, MS, RNC, CPNP, CNS; Gretchen Lawhon, RN, PhD
OBJECTIVE: Determine mean length of recovery time following multiple caregiving activities for preterm infants in the NICU, and factors affecting the time required for infants to return to baseline heart rate and oxygen saturation levels. DESIGN: Longitudinal descriptive comparative. POPULATION: A convenience sample of 81 preterm infants in four age groups were recruited from a Level III NICU between 1999-2001. CONCEPTS: Theoretical model combined Levine's (1967) Conservation Model and Als (1982) Synactive Theory of Development. Biobehavioral variables: heart rate, oxygen saturation, and infant behaviors. Contextual variables: gestational age at treatment, severity of illness, maternal age and smoking history, duration of cluster, and number of painful procedures. METHODS: Computer acquisition of physiological data synchronized with real time video recordings from 4 cameras captured caregiving activities and infant behavior for 4 hours every day during the first week of life, and weekly thereafter until discharge. Caregiving clusters (multiple caregiving activities provided without a 2 minute rest period between activities) were coded from the videotapes into 3 epochs: ten minute baseline, cluster, and twenty minutes following end of cluster. Data analysis included logistic regression, stepwise regression, and descriptive statistics. FINDINGS: More than one thousand clusters were studied. Gestational age at treatment (GESTAT) was the best predictor of recovery to baseline for oxygen saturation, and both GESTAT and painful procedures within the caregiving clusters predicted recovery to baseline heart rate. A twenty minute rest period was adequate for most infants, but approximately one fifth failed to recover within twenty minutes. CONCLUSIONS: Younger gestational age infants and those who experienced a painful procedure within the cluster were the least likely to recover within the twenty minute recovery period.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFactors Affecting Recovery Following Multiple Caregiving Activities with Preterm Infantsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150005-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Factors Affecting Recovery Following Multiple Caregiving Activities with Preterm Infants</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Evans, Jane C., PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Medical College of Ohio</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor and Director, Center for Nursing Research and Evaluation</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jevans@meduohio.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Eliza McCartney, MS, RNC, CPNP, CNS; Gretchen Lawhon, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">OBJECTIVE: Determine mean length of recovery time following multiple caregiving activities for preterm infants in the NICU, and factors affecting the time required for infants to return to baseline heart rate and oxygen saturation levels. DESIGN: Longitudinal descriptive comparative. POPULATION: A convenience sample of 81 preterm infants in four age groups were recruited from a Level III NICU between 1999-2001. CONCEPTS: Theoretical model combined Levine's (1967) Conservation Model and Als (1982) Synactive Theory of Development. Biobehavioral variables: heart rate, oxygen saturation, and infant behaviors. Contextual variables: gestational age at treatment, severity of illness, maternal age and smoking history, duration of cluster, and number of painful procedures. METHODS: Computer acquisition of physiological data synchronized with real time video recordings from 4 cameras captured caregiving activities and infant behavior for 4 hours every day during the first week of life, and weekly thereafter until discharge. Caregiving clusters (multiple caregiving activities provided without a 2 minute rest period between activities) were coded from the videotapes into 3 epochs: ten minute baseline, cluster, and twenty minutes following end of cluster. Data analysis included logistic regression, stepwise regression, and descriptive statistics. FINDINGS: More than one thousand clusters were studied. Gestational age at treatment (GESTAT) was the best predictor of recovery to baseline for oxygen saturation, and both GESTAT and painful procedures within the caregiving clusters predicted recovery to baseline heart rate. A twenty minute rest period was adequate for most infants, but approximately one fifth failed to recover within twenty minutes. CONCLUSIONS: Younger gestational age infants and those who experienced a painful procedure within the cluster were the least likely to recover within the twenty minute recovery period.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:14:21Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:14:21Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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