Moving Beyond Hospital Walls: Building Bridges Between Healthcare Providers and Community Advocates

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150008
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Moving Beyond Hospital Walls: Building Bridges Between Healthcare Providers and Community Advocates
Abstract:
Moving Beyond Hospital Walls: Building Bridges Between Healthcare Providers and Community Advocates
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Finnegan Priest, Caitlin, BA, MPH, Candidate
P.I. Institution Name:George Washington University School of Public Health
Working with a multidisciplinary team to establish a domestic violence training initiative presents unique rewards and challenges, as team members often approach the issue guided by different philosophies, personal experiences, and professional norms. For a facilitator who is accustomed to working with community groups, the ?clinical? approach healthcare providers take to domestic violence can be unfamiliar or daunting. Healthcare providers, in turn, may be unfamiliar with the grassroots-based philosophies of many victim advocates. While shelter-based educators often position domestic violence in a larger context of power and control and other forms of social oppression, medical staff may view it predominantly as an issue that affects patient health. A successful training model will incorporate the philosophical tenets of the battered women's movement, but must also emphasize that domestic violence is a healthcare issue and reinforce the diagnostic benefits of implementing screening practices with every patient encounter. Advocates and clinicians may also hold different beliefs around the concepts of research-based evidence and expertise, and a successful collaboration process will incorporate the voices and knowledge of survivors and front-line community workers as well as published experts. This session will assess the value of the multidisciplinary team model, and participants will discuss how to identify and build relationships with agencies and advocates in their own communities. We will explore the origins of common divergences between grassroots and medical groups, and will discuss how to use these differing philosophies to enrich the collaborative experience, to build lasting professional relationships, and to develop an inclusive and holistic training program.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMoving Beyond Hospital Walls: Building Bridges Between Healthcare Providers and Community Advocatesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150008-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Moving Beyond Hospital Walls: Building Bridges Between Healthcare Providers and Community Advocates</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Finnegan Priest, Caitlin, BA, MPH, Candidate</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">George Washington University School of Public Health</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">caitlinpriest@mac.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Working with a multidisciplinary team to establish a domestic violence training initiative presents unique rewards and challenges, as team members often approach the issue guided by different philosophies, personal experiences, and professional norms. For a facilitator who is accustomed to working with community groups, the ?clinical? approach healthcare providers take to domestic violence can be unfamiliar or daunting. Healthcare providers, in turn, may be unfamiliar with the grassroots-based philosophies of many victim advocates. While shelter-based educators often position domestic violence in a larger context of power and control and other forms of social oppression, medical staff may view it predominantly as an issue that affects patient health. A successful training model will incorporate the philosophical tenets of the battered women's movement, but must also emphasize that domestic violence is a healthcare issue and reinforce the diagnostic benefits of implementing screening practices with every patient encounter. Advocates and clinicians may also hold different beliefs around the concepts of research-based evidence and expertise, and a successful collaboration process will incorporate the voices and knowledge of survivors and front-line community workers as well as published experts. This session will assess the value of the multidisciplinary team model, and participants will discuss how to identify and build relationships with agencies and advocates in their own communities. We will explore the origins of common divergences between grassroots and medical groups, and will discuss how to use these differing philosophies to enrich the collaborative experience, to build lasting professional relationships, and to develop an inclusive and holistic training program.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:14:25Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:14:25Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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