2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150009
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Age Differences in Self-Reported Pain Among Older Adults
Abstract:
Age Differences in Self-Reported Pain Among Older Adults
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Floetke Elliott, Amanda, ARNP
P.I. Institution Name:University of Florida
Co-Authors:Ann L. Horgas, RN, PhD
Background: Prior research has shown relatively high levels of pain prevalence for older adults living in a variety of settings. However, the majority of epidemiological studies of pain in the elderly have not been designed with the problem of pain as the primary objective and most have failed to include many adults over age 80. In studies that did include the oldest-old age group, the majority showed a peak in the prevalence of pain by age 65 with a decline in reported pain among the old-old. Purpose: To investigate age differences in self-reported pain prevalence and intensity in adults over 65 years of age. Method: The sample consisted of 144 adults over age 65 living in nursing homes, assisted living facilities, and in the community (117 female, 27 male) with a mean age of 82.5 years (range 63-98). Participants were asked if they had current pain, pain today, pain last week, and pain everyday last week. Pain intensity for current pain, worst pain, and pain most of the time was measured with a numeric rating scale. Results: There were no significant differences in self-reported pain prevalence between age groups. Pain intensity was not significantly correlated with age, but was positively correlated with higher cognitive status and more painful diagnoses. After controlling for these variables in regression analyses, age did not contribute significantly to the prediction of pain intensity ratings. Cognitive status and the total number of painful diagnoses were significant predictors of self-reported pain intensity. Conclusions: Overall, pain prevalence did not vary by age group within elderly adults. Regression analyses revealed that age did not predict self-reported pain intensity but that cognitive status and the total number of painful diagnoses were significant predictors of pain intensity. Cognitive impairment and more painful diagnoses were associated with less intense pain.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAge Differences in Self-Reported Pain Among Older Adultsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150009-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Age Differences in Self-Reported Pain Among Older Adults</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Floetke Elliott, Amanda, ARNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Florida</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">floetke@nursing.ufl.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Ann L. Horgas, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Prior research has shown relatively high levels of pain prevalence for older adults living in a variety of settings. However, the majority of epidemiological studies of pain in the elderly have not been designed with the problem of pain as the primary objective and most have failed to include many adults over age 80. In studies that did include the oldest-old age group, the majority showed a peak in the prevalence of pain by age 65 with a decline in reported pain among the old-old. Purpose: To investigate age differences in self-reported pain prevalence and intensity in adults over 65 years of age. Method: The sample consisted of 144 adults over age 65 living in nursing homes, assisted living facilities, and in the community (117 female, 27 male) with a mean age of 82.5 years (range 63-98). Participants were asked if they had current pain, pain today, pain last week, and pain everyday last week. Pain intensity for current pain, worst pain, and pain most of the time was measured with a numeric rating scale. Results: There were no significant differences in self-reported pain prevalence between age groups. Pain intensity was not significantly correlated with age, but was positively correlated with higher cognitive status and more painful diagnoses. After controlling for these variables in regression analyses, age did not contribute significantly to the prediction of pain intensity ratings. Cognitive status and the total number of painful diagnoses were significant predictors of self-reported pain intensity. Conclusions: Overall, pain prevalence did not vary by age group within elderly adults. Regression analyses revealed that age did not predict self-reported pain intensity but that cognitive status and the total number of painful diagnoses were significant predictors of pain intensity. Cognitive impairment and more painful diagnoses were associated with less intense pain.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:14:26Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:14:26Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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