A Survey of Physical Examination Techniques Performed by Registered Nurses: Lessons for Nursing Education

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150016
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Survey of Physical Examination Techniques Performed by Registered Nurses: Lessons for Nursing Education
Abstract:
A Survey of Physical Examination Techniques Performed by Registered Nurses: Lessons for Nursing Education
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Giddens, Jean Foret, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of New Mexico
A longstanding concern within the nursing profession has been the entry-level skills of graduates from nursing programs. A common perception, particularly among those in nursing service, is that new graduates are inadequately prepared to practice nursing. The purpose of this study was to identify physical examination competencies needed by graduates of nursing programs. The sample for this study involved 193 randomly selected registered nurses employed in direct patient care roles (in both inpatient and outpatient settings) at a large university-based heath care facility in the Southwest who worked at least 20 hours a week. Data were collected using a 124-item survey of physical examination techniques; participants indicated the average frequency they performed the techniques in their clinical practice. Thirty techniques were identified by the sample as techniques performed frequently or regularly, representing 24% of the examination techniques included on the survey. The majority of these ?core? techniques involve inspection and general observation. Additionally, one third of these techniques are associated with cardiovascular and respiratory assessment. The findings from this study point to an education paradox. Because the nursing literature supports the claim that graduate nurses are not adequately prepared, and because nurses care for increasingly complex patients, it would seem logical that a heavy emphasis be placed on health assessment skills within nursing curricula. The focus of education should be reflective of nursing practice. The findings clarify specific physical examination techniques performed by registered nurses in the practice setting and perhaps provide insight regarding physical examination content and skills to target within nursing curricula.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Survey of Physical Examination Techniques Performed by Registered Nurses: Lessons for Nursing Educationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150016-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Survey of Physical Examination Techniques Performed by Registered Nurses: Lessons for Nursing Education</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Giddens, Jean Foret, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of New Mexico</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jgiddens@salud.unm.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">A longstanding concern within the nursing profession has been the entry-level skills of graduates from nursing programs. A common perception, particularly among those in nursing service, is that new graduates are inadequately prepared to practice nursing. The purpose of this study was to identify physical examination competencies needed by graduates of nursing programs. The sample for this study involved 193 randomly selected registered nurses employed in direct patient care roles (in both inpatient and outpatient settings) at a large university-based heath care facility in the Southwest who worked at least 20 hours a week. Data were collected using a 124-item survey of physical examination techniques; participants indicated the average frequency they performed the techniques in their clinical practice. Thirty techniques were identified by the sample as techniques performed frequently or regularly, representing 24% of the examination techniques included on the survey. The majority of these ?core? techniques involve inspection and general observation. Additionally, one third of these techniques are associated with cardiovascular and respiratory assessment. The findings from this study point to an education paradox. Because the nursing literature supports the claim that graduate nurses are not adequately prepared, and because nurses care for increasingly complex patients, it would seem logical that a heavy emphasis be placed on health assessment skills within nursing curricula. The focus of education should be reflective of nursing practice. The findings clarify specific physical examination techniques performed by registered nurses in the practice setting and perhaps provide insight regarding physical examination content and skills to target within nursing curricula.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:14:35Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:14:35Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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