The Therapeutic Effect of Relaxation on Pain-Distress During an Invasive Procedure

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150025
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Therapeutic Effect of Relaxation on Pain-Distress During an Invasive Procedure
Abstract:
The Therapeutic Effect of Relaxation on Pain-Distress During an Invasive Procedure
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Harris, David, MSN, CPNP
P.I. Institution Name:Children's Memorial Hospital
Co-Authors:Brian Stahulak, BSN, RN, MBA; Joan M. Lokar, MSN, CPNP
Background: the relief of pain-distress during invasive procedures is an important aspect of nursing care of pediatric patients. Several studies have shown that non-pharmacological adjuncts can be useful in the reduction of pain-distress ratings. The purpose of this study was to determine if two validated relaxation techniques, deep breathing and guided imagery, could significantly affect objective and subjective pain-distress measurements in children undergoing intravenous catheterization. Method: The sample consisted of 40 patients undergoing IV insertion. They were split into control and experimental group processes. The experimental group were taught two structured relaxation exercises, one using deep-breathing, and one using guided imagery. Pain-distress ratings using VAS and vital sign parameters were measured pre, during, and post insertion. Measurements were then compared to the group of 20 children that received the IV using a standard procedure and no relaxation. Results: There was a significant (p-.007) reduction in mean arterial pressure (MAP) during IV insertion in the experimental group. There were no significant differences in pain scores (VAS), heart rate or respiratory rate.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Therapeutic Effect of Relaxation on Pain-Distress During an Invasive Procedureen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150025-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Therapeutic Effect of Relaxation on Pain-Distress During an Invasive Procedure</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Harris, David, MSN, CPNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Children's Memorial Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dcharris@childrensmemorial.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Brian Stahulak, BSN, RN, MBA; Joan M. Lokar, MSN, CPNP</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: the relief of pain-distress during invasive procedures is an important aspect of nursing care of pediatric patients. Several studies have shown that non-pharmacological adjuncts can be useful in the reduction of pain-distress ratings. The purpose of this study was to determine if two validated relaxation techniques, deep breathing and guided imagery, could significantly affect objective and subjective pain-distress measurements in children undergoing intravenous catheterization. Method: The sample consisted of 40 patients undergoing IV insertion. They were split into control and experimental group processes. The experimental group were taught two structured relaxation exercises, one using deep-breathing, and one using guided imagery. Pain-distress ratings using VAS and vital sign parameters were measured pre, during, and post insertion. Measurements were then compared to the group of 20 children that received the IV using a standard procedure and no relaxation. Results: There was a significant (p-.007) reduction in mean arterial pressure (MAP) during IV insertion in the experimental group. There were no significant differences in pain scores (VAS), heart rate or respiratory rate.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:14:48Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:14:48Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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