Application of the Theory of Reasoned Action to Evaluate Faculty Intentions to Integrate Tobacco Education in Advanced Practice Nursing Curricula

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150026
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Application of the Theory of Reasoned Action to Evaluate Faculty Intentions to Integrate Tobacco Education in Advanced Practice Nursing Curricula
Abstract:
Application of the Theory of Reasoned Action to Evaluate Faculty Intentions to Integrate Tobacco Education in Advanced Practice Nursing Curricula
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Heath, Janie, PhD, APRN-BC, ANP, ACNP
P.I. Institution Name:Georgetown University School of Nursing & Health Studies
Title:Assistant Professor and Director of the Acute Care NP and Critical Care CNS Programs at Georgetown University
OBJECTIVE: To examine the relationships among the attitudes of advanced practice nursing (APN) faculty (nurse practitioner, nurse midwifery, nurse anesthesia and clinical nurse specialist) toward tobacco prevention and tobacco cessation education. METHOD: A survey with 68 items was mailed to 376 directors of advanced practice nursing programs throughout the United States. RESULTS: Forty-three percent responded to the survey (n = 161). The majority of participants (65.3%) were teaching 3 hours or less of tobacco prevention and tobacco cessation content in an entire APN program of study. On a scale of 1 = very low effectiveness and 7 = very high effectiveness, the participants reported the highest self-efficacy scores with teaching the health effects of tobacco related diseases (M = 4.88; SD = 1.64) and the lowest with teaching the contents of cigarette smoke (M = 3.39; SD = 1.89). Eighty percent of the participants reported diet (scores 5 or higher) as the most important health prevention topic and tobacco prevention and tobacco cessation was ranked as the fourth important (M = 5.42; SD = 1.76). Demographic variables with the most influence on intentions to increase tobacco education were gender, academic years teaching, level of education, and course responsibility. The variable with the most influence was attitude about increasing tobacco education in APN curricula. DISCUSSION: A gap exist in APN curricula on tobacco education. National efforts are needed to ensure wide-spread curricular changes occur to help reduce the morbidity and mortality related to tobacco use.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleApplication of the Theory of Reasoned Action to Evaluate Faculty Intentions to Integrate Tobacco Education in Advanced Practice Nursing Curriculaen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150026-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Application of the Theory of Reasoned Action to Evaluate Faculty Intentions to Integrate Tobacco Education in Advanced Practice Nursing Curricula</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Heath, Janie, PhD, APRN-BC, ANP, ACNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Georgetown University School of Nursing &amp; Health Studies</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor and Director of the Acute Care NP and Critical Care CNS Programs at Georgetown University</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ejh@georgetown.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">OBJECTIVE: To examine the relationships among the attitudes of advanced practice nursing (APN) faculty (nurse practitioner, nurse midwifery, nurse anesthesia and clinical nurse specialist) toward tobacco prevention and tobacco cessation education. METHOD: A survey with 68 items was mailed to 376 directors of advanced practice nursing programs throughout the United States. RESULTS: Forty-three percent responded to the survey (n = 161). The majority of participants (65.3%) were teaching 3 hours or less of tobacco prevention and tobacco cessation content in an entire APN program of study. On a scale of 1 = very low effectiveness and 7 = very high effectiveness, the participants reported the highest self-efficacy scores with teaching the health effects of tobacco related diseases (M = 4.88; SD = 1.64) and the lowest with teaching the contents of cigarette smoke (M = 3.39; SD = 1.89). Eighty percent of the participants reported diet (scores 5 or higher) as the most important health prevention topic and tobacco prevention and tobacco cessation was ranked as the fourth important (M = 5.42; SD = 1.76). Demographic variables with the most influence on intentions to increase tobacco education were gender, academic years teaching, level of education, and course responsibility. The variable with the most influence was attitude about increasing tobacco education in APN curricula. DISCUSSION: A gap exist in APN curricula on tobacco education. National efforts are needed to ensure wide-spread curricular changes occur to help reduce the morbidity and mortality related to tobacco use.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:14:49Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:14:49Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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