Older Adults: The Experience of Older Parents of Adult Children With Mental Illness

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150030
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Older Adults: The Experience of Older Parents of Adult Children With Mental Illness
Abstract:
Older Adults: The Experience of Older Parents of Adult Children With Mental Illness
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Hitchens, Emily A., EdD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Seattle Pacific University
Title:Professor and Associate Dean of the School of Health Sciences
Co-Authors:Martha L. Worcester, PhD, ARNP
The purpose of this research was to discover experiences of older parents who have adult children with mental illness. Although many parents over age 65 provide a life time of care for these adult children, minimal research was found addressing the role of the older adult as caregiver to an adult child. Using a qualitative approach and content analysis, the lived experiences of older parents of adult children with mental illness were examined. Individual semi-structured interviews were conducted with seven parents, and a guided discussion with a focus group. Concerns included parents' coping with their own reactions, interacting and assisting adult children, and involvement with other helpers. The main themes that emerged from these three concerns were persevering, accommodating, and admonishing respectively. Preserving involved strategies of self talk such as explaining to themselves the reasons for the adult child's illness. Strategies used countered feelings of guilt and shame, and maintained emotional balance. Accommodating encompassed behaviors found most helpful in interacting with the adult child to prevent loss of the relationship or adverse behaviors e.g. speaking softly to the when the adult child was agitated or providing a place to stay when necessary for safety of the adult child. Admonishing was the response of family, friends, or professionals Parents' accommodations were often labeled enabling by others who advised parents to apply tough-love. Researchers concluded that older parents experienced the stigma of mental illness and found minimal support in their struggle. Despite repeated efforts to access helping agencies, the only on-going support the adult child received was from parents. Parents were committed to supporting the adult child over a life time. All parents expressed desires for different types of support than they had experienced
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleOlder Adults: The Experience of Older Parents of Adult Children With Mental Illnessen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150030-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Older Adults: The Experience of Older Parents of Adult Children With Mental Illness</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hitchens, Emily A., EdD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Seattle Pacific University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor and Associate Dean of the School of Health Sciences</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">hitchens@spu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Martha L. Worcester, PhD, ARNP</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this research was to discover experiences of older parents who have adult children with mental illness. Although many parents over age 65 provide a life time of care for these adult children, minimal research was found addressing the role of the older adult as caregiver to an adult child. Using a qualitative approach and content analysis, the lived experiences of older parents of adult children with mental illness were examined. Individual semi-structured interviews were conducted with seven parents, and a guided discussion with a focus group. Concerns included parents' coping with their own reactions, interacting and assisting adult children, and involvement with other helpers. The main themes that emerged from these three concerns were persevering, accommodating, and admonishing respectively. Preserving involved strategies of self talk such as explaining to themselves the reasons for the adult child's illness. Strategies used countered feelings of guilt and shame, and maintained emotional balance. Accommodating encompassed behaviors found most helpful in interacting with the adult child to prevent loss of the relationship or adverse behaviors e.g. speaking softly to the when the adult child was agitated or providing a place to stay when necessary for safety of the adult child. Admonishing was the response of family, friends, or professionals Parents' accommodations were often labeled enabling by others who advised parents to apply tough-love. Researchers concluded that older parents experienced the stigma of mental illness and found minimal support in their struggle. Despite repeated efforts to access helping agencies, the only on-going support the adult child received was from parents. Parents were committed to supporting the adult child over a life time. All parents expressed desires for different types of support than they had experienced</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:14:54Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:14:54Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.