Motherhood, Stress, and Role Strain in Junior Enlisted Air Force Women

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150032
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Motherhood, Stress, and Role Strain in Junior Enlisted Air Force Women
Abstract:
Motherhood, Stress, and Role Strain in Junior Enlisted Air Force Women
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Hopkins, Denise, MN, RN
P.I. Institution Name:The Ohio State University
Title:Motherhood, Stress, and Role Strain in Junior Enlisted Air Force Women
Problem: Women comprise 15% of the U.S. military and 38% leave prematurely due to pregnancy, medical problems, misconduct, performance shortfalls, or parenthood. Research shows that for working women stress is highest when pre-school aged children are present, and that for military women stress is highest among married with an absent spouse, younger enlisted, and of least education. Thirty-one percent of women report stress simply due to being women in the military. The combination of military, work and family may contribute to stress. Theoretical Framework: Marmot and Wilkinson's Social Determinants of Health Model Subjects: 100 junior enlisted women (17-24 years old) at Wright Patterson Air Force Base, 50 with pre-school aged children and 50 without. Methodology: Using multiple regression and ANOVA this descriptive study will: 1) Identify the predictors of multiple role strain from type of work, perceived adequacy of resources (PAR) marital status, and maternal status. 2) Identify the predictors of stress related symptoms from type of work, PAR, marital status, and maternal status. 3) Identify predictors of health status from type of work, PAR, marital status, and maternal status, multiple role strain and stress related symptoms. 4) Identify the predictors of career aspiration from type of work, PAR, marital status, and maternal status, multiple role strain and stress related symptoms, health status, family of origin socio-economic class, and race/ethnicity. A secondary aim is to describe differences between young enlisted women with and without children on: type of work, PAR, marital status, and maternal status, multiple role strain, stress related symptoms, health status, family of origin socio-economic class, race/ethnicity and career aspiration. Results and implications: Results will enable leaders to develop interventions for junior enlisted women that address multiple role strain and stress, and decision-making about initiating motherhood.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMotherhood, Stress, and Role Strain in Junior Enlisted Air Force Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150032-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Motherhood, Stress, and Role Strain in Junior Enlisted Air Force Women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hopkins, Denise, MN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">The Ohio State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Motherhood, Stress, and Role Strain in Junior Enlisted Air Force Women</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">hopkins.521@osu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem: Women comprise 15% of the U.S. military and 38% leave prematurely due to pregnancy, medical problems, misconduct, performance shortfalls, or parenthood. Research shows that for working women stress is highest when pre-school aged children are present, and that for military women stress is highest among married with an absent spouse, younger enlisted, and of least education. Thirty-one percent of women report stress simply due to being women in the military. The combination of military, work and family may contribute to stress. Theoretical Framework: Marmot and Wilkinson's Social Determinants of Health Model Subjects: 100 junior enlisted women (17-24 years old) at Wright Patterson Air Force Base, 50 with pre-school aged children and 50 without. Methodology: Using multiple regression and ANOVA this descriptive study will: 1) Identify the predictors of multiple role strain from type of work, perceived adequacy of resources (PAR) marital status, and maternal status. 2) Identify the predictors of stress related symptoms from type of work, PAR, marital status, and maternal status. 3) Identify predictors of health status from type of work, PAR, marital status, and maternal status, multiple role strain and stress related symptoms. 4) Identify the predictors of career aspiration from type of work, PAR, marital status, and maternal status, multiple role strain and stress related symptoms, health status, family of origin socio-economic class, and race/ethnicity. A secondary aim is to describe differences between young enlisted women with and without children on: type of work, PAR, marital status, and maternal status, multiple role strain, stress related symptoms, health status, family of origin socio-economic class, race/ethnicity and career aspiration. Results and implications: Results will enable leaders to develop interventions for junior enlisted women that address multiple role strain and stress, and decision-making about initiating motherhood.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:14:57Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:14:57Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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