2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150049
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Diabetes and Native American Ceremonies
Abstract:
Diabetes and Native American Ceremonies
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Kirk, Robert, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Porcupine Clinic
The Porcupine Clinic in Porcupine South Dakota (Pine Ridge Reservation) has developed guides for people who have diabetes and wish to take part in Lakota Ceremonies. The guides are now being adapted to the ceremonies of the Dakota and Ojibwa Tribes in South Dakota and Minnesota. The guides have been found useful for a number of people who advise diabetic Native Americans. Diabetes is a new disease for Native Americans. However the lifestyle changes required for the management of diabetes can be supported by many of the older Native American traditions. Often the losses that come with the diagnosis of diabetes can be dealt with by drawing on the Native American traditions that emphasize personal strength and courage along with the connections with family and the world. Unfortunately some of the Native American ceremonies pose special challenges to a person with diabetes. For example; the heat and hot rocks of the Sweat Lodge, the fasting of the Vision Quest, and the lacerations of the Sun Dance need to be considered and planned for by a diabetic. Successfully dealing with these challenges requires insight into an individual's response to stress, medication and diet. This understanding combined with other native traditions can go a long way to managing diabetes. The guides were written drawing first from published information and then from interviews with Native Americans who have diabetes yet regularly participate in their ceremonies. Leaders of the ceremonies were also consulted. The guides are written for specific ceremonies and the participants are referred to ceremonial leaders who have experience in working with diabetics. It is our experience that with proper planning, people with diabetes can participate fully in all Native American Ceremonies.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDiabetes and Native American Ceremoniesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150049-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Diabetes and Native American Ceremonies</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kirk, Robert, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Porcupine Clinic</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">rskirk@usfamily.net</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The Porcupine Clinic in Porcupine South Dakota (Pine Ridge Reservation) has developed guides for people who have diabetes and wish to take part in Lakota Ceremonies. The guides are now being adapted to the ceremonies of the Dakota and Ojibwa Tribes in South Dakota and Minnesota. The guides have been found useful for a number of people who advise diabetic Native Americans. Diabetes is a new disease for Native Americans. However the lifestyle changes required for the management of diabetes can be supported by many of the older Native American traditions. Often the losses that come with the diagnosis of diabetes can be dealt with by drawing on the Native American traditions that emphasize personal strength and courage along with the connections with family and the world. Unfortunately some of the Native American ceremonies pose special challenges to a person with diabetes. For example; the heat and hot rocks of the Sweat Lodge, the fasting of the Vision Quest, and the lacerations of the Sun Dance need to be considered and planned for by a diabetic. Successfully dealing with these challenges requires insight into an individual's response to stress, medication and diet. This understanding combined with other native traditions can go a long way to managing diabetes. The guides were written drawing first from published information and then from interviews with Native Americans who have diabetes yet regularly participate in their ceremonies. Leaders of the ceremonies were also consulted. The guides are written for specific ceremonies and the participants are referred to ceremonial leaders who have experience in working with diabetics. It is our experience that with proper planning, people with diabetes can participate fully in all Native American Ceremonies.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:15:19Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:15:19Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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