2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150051
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Improving Survey Response Rates
Abstract:
Improving Survey Response Rates
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Klakovich, Marilyn D., DNSc, RN, CNAA
P.I. Institution Name:Azusa Pacific University
Title:Director of Continuing Education
Response rates to mailed surveys have been historically low despite various efforts to maximize returns. A variety of approaches for enhancing survey responses have been reported in the literature. Limited studies were located where there was a comparison of response rates when a variety of incentive techniques were used. Given the additional expensive of using incentives in research studies, their effectiveness must be supported by sound research. We hypothesized that surveys accompanied by a gift will result in a higher response rate than surveys where a gift is promised for survey return and surveys with no incentive. This study was conducted as part of a larger study to validate an instrument. The sample included four clinical instructors from American Association of Colleges of Nursing accredited schools of nursing (N = 557) for a total of 2,228. Systematic sampling was used to divide the sample into three groups. Group A received a magnetic address book, Group B participants were informed that they would receive a gift upon return of the completed survey, and Group C participants were not provided with any additional incentive. All participants were informed that a copy of the newly developed instrument and the results would be shared upon completion of the study. Chi-squared analysis supported the hypothesis (p <.05) with a 30% response rate in group A (n = 219), a 25% response rate in group B (n=189), and a 22% response rate in group C (n = 167). Although the overall response rate was low (26% (n = 578), this is not surprising given the complexity of the survey requiring significant time commitment. The response rate was enhanced by including a gift with the initial mailing. Researchers should continue to test strategies for increasing response rates as part of other studies.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImproving Survey Response Ratesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150051-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Improving Survey Response Rates</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Klakovich, Marilyn D., DNSc, RN, CNAA</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Azusa Pacific University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Director of Continuing Education</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mklakovich@apu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Response rates to mailed surveys have been historically low despite various efforts to maximize returns. A variety of approaches for enhancing survey responses have been reported in the literature. Limited studies were located where there was a comparison of response rates when a variety of incentive techniques were used. Given the additional expensive of using incentives in research studies, their effectiveness must be supported by sound research. We hypothesized that surveys accompanied by a gift will result in a higher response rate than surveys where a gift is promised for survey return and surveys with no incentive. This study was conducted as part of a larger study to validate an instrument. The sample included four clinical instructors from American Association of Colleges of Nursing accredited schools of nursing (N = 557) for a total of 2,228. Systematic sampling was used to divide the sample into three groups. Group A received a magnetic address book, Group B participants were informed that they would receive a gift upon return of the completed survey, and Group C participants were not provided with any additional incentive. All participants were informed that a copy of the newly developed instrument and the results would be shared upon completion of the study. Chi-squared analysis supported the hypothesis (p &lt;.05) with a 30% response rate in group A (n = 219), a 25% response rate in group B (n=189), and a 22% response rate in group C (n = 167). Although the overall response rate was low (26% (n = 578), this is not surprising given the complexity of the survey requiring significant time commitment. The response rate was enhanced by including a gift with the initial mailing. Researchers should continue to test strategies for increasing response rates as part of other studies.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:15:22Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:15:22Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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