2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150062
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nursing Care for the Old-Order Amish
Abstract:
Nursing Care for the Old-Order Amish
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:Graham, Linda L., MSN, APRN, BC
P.I. Institution Name:Indiana University-Purdue Universtiy Fort Wayne
Title:Associate Professor of Nursing
This presentation will examine common cultural aspects of the Old Order Amish living in America. Giger and Davidhizar’s Transcultural Assessment Model will be used as the framework to analyze their six cultural phenoma. The six cultural phenoma including communication, space, social organization, time, environmental control, and biological variations will be applied to the Old Order Amish life ways. Particular healthcare practices of this sequestered population will be assessed. Areas to be reviewed will include providing nursing care for individuals who are: living with a chronic illness or disabilities, receiving treatment for cancer, coping with the death and dying process, and receiving care for mental illness or substance abuse. Examples of modifications in ways of presenting and providing nursing care that is culturally sensitive will be introduced. The Amish spiritual belief, “in the world, but not of the world” will be analyzed in relationship to providing culturally component care. Particular attention will be given to the rising cost of healthcare, technology, formal education, employment outside the family farm, role of lay midwives, community healers, commonly used herbs and other alternative therapies. Information gleaned from working with the Amish will be used to generalize to other to other minority groups nurses frequently encounter. The concept of what care means and the qualities of a ”good nurse” to this cultural community will be analyzed.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNursing Care for the Old-Order Amishen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150062-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Nursing Care for the Old-Order Amish</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Graham, Linda L., MSN, APRN, BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Indiana University-Purdue Universtiy Fort Wayne</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">graham@ipfw.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">This presentation will examine common cultural aspects of the Old Order Amish living in America. Giger and Davidhizar&rsquo;s Transcultural Assessment Model will be used as the framework to analyze their six cultural phenoma. The six cultural phenoma including communication, space, social organization, time, environmental control, and biological variations will be applied to the Old Order Amish life ways. Particular healthcare practices of this sequestered population will be assessed. Areas to be reviewed will include providing nursing care for individuals who are: living with a chronic illness or disabilities, receiving treatment for cancer, coping with the death and dying process, and receiving care for mental illness or substance abuse. Examples of modifications in ways of presenting and providing nursing care that is culturally sensitive will be introduced. The Amish spiritual belief, &ldquo;in the world, but not of the world&rdquo; will be analyzed in relationship to providing culturally component care. Particular attention will be given to the rising cost of healthcare, technology, formal education, employment outside the family farm, role of lay midwives, community healers, commonly used herbs and other alternative therapies. Information gleaned from working with the Amish will be used to generalize to other to other minority groups nurses frequently encounter. The concept of what care means and the qualities of a &rdquo;good nurse&rdquo; to this cultural community will be analyzed.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:15:37Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:15:37Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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