Predictors of Weight Gain in Premenopausal Women with Early-Stage Breast Cancer

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150076
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Predictors of Weight Gain in Premenopausal Women with Early-Stage Breast Cancer
Abstract:
Predictors of Weight Gain in Premenopausal Women with Early-Stage Breast Cancer
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:Ingram, Carolyn, RN, DNSc
P.I. Institution Name:McMaster University
Title:Assistant Professor
Weight gain during breast cancer chemotherapy has been reported in up to 96% of patients, and has links to early recurrence, increased risk of later chronic disease, impaired adjustment and poor treatment adherence. It was re-examined because of the dramatic changes in adjuvant treatment regimens in recent years. The study examined breast cancer-associated weight gain in a sample of premenopausal, Stage I and II breast cancer patients receiving chemotherapy at two clinics in central-western Ontario. The research questions were: 1) What is the rate and magnitude of breast cancer-associated weight change? 2) What are the caloric intakes, physical activity levels, resting energy expenditures (REEs), nicotine intakes, and menopausal symptoms of subjects who gain, maintain or lose weight? 3) Are there patterns of weight and body composition change during treatment? 4) How do caloric intake, physical activity, REE, nicotine intake, and menopausal symptoms predict weight change? A correlational, longitudinal design with consecutive case sampling was used, and a sample 91 patients was assembled. Participants were enroled and baseline measures were collected before treatment began. Subsequent data were collected during every-other treatment cycle. Dietary intake, physical activity, nicotine intake and menopausal symptoms were measured via questionnaire, while data on REE, weight, height and body mass index (the outcome) were obtained via anthropometric techniques. Subjects were slightly overweight at baseline; 45% were significantly overweight. The mean weight change for the sample was a gain of 1.4kg. Weights were stable for 55% of women, while 34% gained and 11% lost weight. Although adult weight gain is predominantly increased fat mass, weight gainers in this sample also experienced small gains in lean body mass. These results update previous knowledge about breast-cancer associated weight gain and its predictors, and lay the groundwork for targeting weight management interventions to treatment, weight and body composition profiles.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePredictors of Weight Gain in Premenopausal Women with Early-Stage Breast Canceren_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150076-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Predictors of Weight Gain in Premenopausal Women with Early-Stage Breast Cancer</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Ingram, Carolyn, RN, DNSc</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">McMaster University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ingramc@mcmaster.ca</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Weight gain during breast cancer chemotherapy has been reported in up to 96% of patients, and has links to early recurrence, increased risk of later chronic disease, impaired adjustment and poor treatment adherence. It was re-examined because of the dramatic changes in adjuvant treatment regimens in recent years. The study examined breast cancer-associated weight gain in a sample of premenopausal, Stage I and II breast cancer patients receiving chemotherapy at two clinics in central-western Ontario. The research questions were: 1) What is the rate and magnitude of breast cancer-associated weight change? 2) What are the caloric intakes, physical activity levels, resting energy expenditures (REEs), nicotine intakes, and menopausal symptoms of subjects who gain, maintain or lose weight? 3) Are there patterns of weight and body composition change during treatment? 4) How do caloric intake, physical activity, REE, nicotine intake, and menopausal symptoms predict weight change? A correlational, longitudinal design with consecutive case sampling was used, and a sample 91 patients was assembled. Participants were enroled and baseline measures were collected before treatment began. Subsequent data were collected during every-other treatment cycle. Dietary intake, physical activity, nicotine intake and menopausal symptoms were measured via questionnaire, while data on REE, weight, height and body mass index (the outcome) were obtained via anthropometric techniques. Subjects were slightly overweight at baseline; 45% were significantly overweight. The mean weight change for the sample was a gain of 1.4kg. Weights were stable for 55% of women, while 34% gained and 11% lost weight. Although adult weight gain is predominantly increased fat mass, weight gainers in this sample also experienced small gains in lean body mass. These results update previous knowledge about breast-cancer associated weight gain and its predictors, and lay the groundwork for targeting weight management interventions to treatment, weight and body composition profiles.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:15:55Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:15:55Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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