Participant Satisfaction with a School Telehealth Education Program Using Interactive Compressed Video Delivery Methods in Rural Arkansas

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150077
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Participant Satisfaction with a School Telehealth Education Program Using Interactive Compressed Video Delivery Methods in Rural Arkansas
Abstract:
Participant Satisfaction with a School Telehealth Education Program Using Interactive Compressed Video Delivery Methods in Rural Arkansas
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:Irwin, Cathy A., PhD, RN, CS
P.I. Institution Name:University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences
Title:Research Associate
Co-Authors:Ann B. Bynum, EdD; Charles O. Cranford, DDS, MPA; George S. Denny, PhD
Objective Socioeconomic and demographic factors can affect the impact of telehealth education programs that use interactive compressed video technology. This study assessed program satisfaction among participants in the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences’ School Telehealth Education Program delivered by interactive compressed video. Design, Sample, Variables, and Methods Variables in the one-group posttest study were age, gender, ethnicity, education, community size, and program topics for years 1997-1999. The convenience sample included 3,319 participants in junior high and high schools. The School Telehealth Education Program provided information about health risks, disease prevention, health promotion, personal growth, and health sciences. Findings Adolescents reported medium to high levels of satisfaction regarding program interest and quality. Significantly higher satisfaction was expressed for programs on muscular dystrophy, anatomy of the heart, and tobacco addiction (p < 0.001 to p = 0.003). Females, African Americans, and junior high school students reported significantly greater satisfaction (p < 0.001 to p = 0.005). High school students reported significantly greater satisfaction than junior high school students regarding the interactive video equipment (p = 0.011). White females (p = 0.025) and African American males (p = 0.004) in smaller, rural communities reported higher satisfaction than White males. Conclusions The School Telehealth Education Program, delivered by interactive compressed video, promoted program satisfaction among rural and minority populations and among junior high and high school students. Implications Effective program methods included an emphasis on participants’ learning needs, increasing access in rural areas among ethnic groups, speaker communication, and clarity of the program presentation.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleParticipant Satisfaction with a School Telehealth Education Program Using Interactive Compressed Video Delivery Methods in Rural Arkansasen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150077-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Participant Satisfaction with a School Telehealth Education Program Using Interactive Compressed Video Delivery Methods in Rural Arkansas</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Irwin, Cathy A., PhD, RN, CS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Research Associate</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cirwin@ahecnw.uams.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Ann B. Bynum, EdD; Charles O. Cranford, DDS, MPA; George S. Denny, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective Socioeconomic and demographic factors can affect the impact of telehealth education programs that use interactive compressed video technology. This study assessed program satisfaction among participants in the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences&rsquo; School Telehealth Education Program delivered by interactive compressed video. Design, Sample, Variables, and Methods Variables in the one-group posttest study were age, gender, ethnicity, education, community size, and program topics for years 1997-1999. The convenience sample included 3,319 participants in junior high and high schools. The School Telehealth Education Program provided information about health risks, disease prevention, health promotion, personal growth, and health sciences. Findings Adolescents reported medium to high levels of satisfaction regarding program interest and quality. Significantly higher satisfaction was expressed for programs on muscular dystrophy, anatomy of the heart, and tobacco addiction (p &lt; 0.001 to p = 0.003). Females, African Americans, and junior high school students reported significantly greater satisfaction (p &lt; 0.001 to p = 0.005). High school students reported significantly greater satisfaction than junior high school students regarding the interactive video equipment (p = 0.011). White females (p = 0.025) and African American males (p = 0.004) in smaller, rural communities reported higher satisfaction than White males. Conclusions The School Telehealth Education Program, delivered by interactive compressed video, promoted program satisfaction among rural and minority populations and among junior high and high school students. Implications Effective program methods included an emphasis on participants&rsquo; learning needs, increasing access in rural areas among ethnic groups, speaker communication, and clarity of the program presentation.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:15:56Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:15:56Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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