2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150079
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Making the Most of Caring from the Male Perspective
Abstract:
Making the Most of Caring from the Male Perspective
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:Jackson, Lee J., MSN, BSN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Texas Health Center at Tyler
Title:Director of Inpatient Nursing
Labor shortages, a profession in crisis, and the increasing demands of an aging population, all lead to creative resolutions. One of the more favored solutions during this current shortage of nurses, increasing the diversity of the work force, includes the addition of more male nurses to the ranks. However, there are those who do not look favorably on this endeavor, citing gender differences that are viewed as undesirable in the decidedly feminine, caring world of the nurse. If caring is "women's work", men will certainly have different interpretations, which may not be optimum in the realm of the art of nursing, and may represent a threat or a distorted version of what was intended as the true calling from Nightingale's point of view. The question becomes, do men care differently, and if so, how do those differences affect their roles in nursing? Are the differences worth noting? What can we do to maximize the gender points of view and make the partnership a better one? The attributes of care which men bring to the profession must be embraced as well as the attributes of physical strength, team work, leadership and competitiveness they bring to the table. Women bring a unique set of attributes to the profession, not the least of which is their nurturing ability to care. Clearly defining the male perspective of care will assist the process of making nursing a more harmonious profession rather than one labeled feminine with a small percentage of males who are considered "odd".
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMaking the Most of Caring from the Male Perspectiveen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150079-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Making the Most of Caring from the Male Perspective</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Jackson, Lee J., MSN, BSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Texas Health Center at Tyler</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Director of Inpatient Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lee.jackson@uthct.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Labor shortages, a profession in crisis, and the increasing demands of an aging population, all lead to creative resolutions. One of the more favored solutions during this current shortage of nurses, increasing the diversity of the work force, includes the addition of more male nurses to the ranks. However, there are those who do not look favorably on this endeavor, citing gender differences that are viewed as undesirable in the decidedly feminine, caring world of the nurse. If caring is &quot;women's work&quot;, men will certainly have different interpretations, which may not be optimum in the realm of the art of nursing, and may represent a threat or a distorted version of what was intended as the true calling from Nightingale's point of view. The question becomes, do men care differently, and if so, how do those differences affect their roles in nursing? Are the differences worth noting? What can we do to maximize the gender points of view and make the partnership a better one? The attributes of care which men bring to the profession must be embraced as well as the attributes of physical strength, team work, leadership and competitiveness they bring to the table. Women bring a unique set of attributes to the profession, not the least of which is their nurturing ability to care. Clearly defining the male perspective of care will assist the process of making nursing a more harmonious profession rather than one labeled feminine with a small percentage of males who are considered &quot;odd&quot;.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:15:59Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:15:59Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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