Stress and Coping Responses: Siblings of Children with Down Syndrome or Autism

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150103
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Stress and Coping Responses: Siblings of Children with Down Syndrome or Autism
Abstract:
Stress and Coping Responses: Siblings of Children with Down Syndrome or Autism
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:Mandleco, Barbara, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Brigham Young University
Title:Associate Dean and Associate Professor
Co-Authors:Tina Dyches, PhD; Susanne Olsen, PhD
The purpose of this qualitative, descriptive design was to identify and describe stressors and coping responses as actually perceived and reported by 32 children living with a brother or sister with Down syndrome (n = 19) or autism (n = 13). Families were drawn from a larger study investigating family adaptation to disability. The children in this study had a mean age of 10 years, 4 months. Following approval from appropriate institutional review boards and after obtaining informed consent/assent, siblings of children with Down syndrome or autism completed daily semi-structured diaries for two weeks. Perceived stressors were identified using two statements: (a) The hardest thing about living with my brother/sister (child with special needs) today was; and (b) Other things that upset me today were. Coping strategies were identified when children completed the statement: This is what I did about it. Diaries were transcribed verbatim and entries were analyzed through a process of content analysis with appropriate application of methods to assure rigor and trustworthiness. Challenges identified in living with a sibling with Down syndrome or autism were related to the child's behavior (aggression, disruption, uncooperativeness) or caring for the child, as well as stressors encountered in everyday activities independent of the child with Down syndrome or autism (homework, demands from parents). Ways the siblings coped included retaliating verbally or physically, seeking help from others, ignoring the situation, or doing nothing. Both sets of siblings identified similar stressors and coping mechanisms. Results validate the importance of gathering data in an open-ended manner directly from siblings and confirmed that nursing interventions should be based on assessment of individual differences in stress appraisal and coping efforts. The project also offers questions for future study and implications for theory and instrument development.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleStress and Coping Responses: Siblings of Children with Down Syndrome or Autismen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150103-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Stress and Coping Responses: Siblings of Children with Down Syndrome or Autism</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Mandleco, Barbara, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Brigham Young University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Dean and Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Barbara_Mandleco@BYU.EDU</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Tina Dyches, PhD; Susanne Olsen, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this qualitative, descriptive design was to identify and describe stressors and coping responses as actually perceived and reported by 32 children living with a brother or sister with Down syndrome (n = 19) or autism (n = 13). Families were drawn from a larger study investigating family adaptation to disability. The children in this study had a mean age of 10 years, 4 months. Following approval from appropriate institutional review boards and after obtaining informed consent/assent, siblings of children with Down syndrome or autism completed daily semi-structured diaries for two weeks. Perceived stressors were identified using two statements: (a) The hardest thing about living with my brother/sister (child with special needs) today was; and (b) Other things that upset me today were. Coping strategies were identified when children completed the statement: This is what I did about it. Diaries were transcribed verbatim and entries were analyzed through a process of content analysis with appropriate application of methods to assure rigor and trustworthiness. Challenges identified in living with a sibling with Down syndrome or autism were related to the child's behavior (aggression, disruption, uncooperativeness) or caring for the child, as well as stressors encountered in everyday activities independent of the child with Down syndrome or autism (homework, demands from parents). Ways the siblings coped included retaliating verbally or physically, seeking help from others, ignoring the situation, or doing nothing. Both sets of siblings identified similar stressors and coping mechanisms. Results validate the importance of gathering data in an open-ended manner directly from siblings and confirmed that nursing interventions should be based on assessment of individual differences in stress appraisal and coping efforts. The project also offers questions for future study and implications for theory and instrument development.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:16:32Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:16:32Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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