Don't Threaten Me; Talk with Me: Patient-Provider Communication and Diabetes Management

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150105
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Don't Threaten Me; Talk with Me: Patient-Provider Communication and Diabetes Management
Abstract:
Don't Threaten Me; Talk with Me: Patient-Provider Communication and Diabetes Management
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:Matthews, Susan M., MSN
P.I. Institution Name:Bluegrass Regional Healthcare
Title:C-FNP, C-WOCN
Diabetes affects more than 16 million people in the United States; nearly 9 million are women. Understanding the psychosocial aspects affecting women's self-care behaviors and health-seeking behaviors is fundamental to improve outcomes of diabetes. The purpose of this study was to describe what takes place within the social setting of elderly women managing diabetes. Particular emphasis was placed on the role of communication between patient and provider as a potential barrier to adherence to treatment regimens. Grounded-theory and focus group methodologies were used to explore the phenomena of adherence to treatment regimen and the patient-provider relationship among women with diabetes. Data were obtained via individual in-depth interviews with 5 women over age 60 with Type 2 diabetes as well as a focus group including all participants. Four major factors affecting adherence to treatment were identified: communication, knowledge, diet, and consequences. Patient-provider communication was the most important factor affecting diabetes adherence.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDon't Threaten Me; Talk with Me: Patient-Provider Communication and Diabetes Managementen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150105-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Don't Threaten Me; Talk with Me: Patient-Provider Communication and Diabetes Management</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Matthews, Susan M., MSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Bluegrass Regional Healthcare</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">C-FNP, C-WOCN</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">smatt2@uky.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Diabetes affects more than 16 million people in the United States; nearly 9 million are women. Understanding the psychosocial aspects affecting women's self-care behaviors and health-seeking behaviors is fundamental to improve outcomes of diabetes. The purpose of this study was to describe what takes place within the social setting of elderly women managing diabetes. Particular emphasis was placed on the role of communication between patient and provider as a potential barrier to adherence to treatment regimens. Grounded-theory and focus group methodologies were used to explore the phenomena of adherence to treatment regimen and the patient-provider relationship among women with diabetes. Data were obtained via individual in-depth interviews with 5 women over age 60 with Type 2 diabetes as well as a focus group including all participants. Four major factors affecting adherence to treatment were identified: communication, knowledge, diet, and consequences. Patient-provider communication was the most important factor affecting diabetes adherence.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:16:35Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:16:35Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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