Latino Men and Women's Views on Intimate Partner Violence and Its Effect on Children

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150106
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Latino Men and Women's Views on Intimate Partner Violence and Its Effect on Children
Abstract:
Latino Men and Women's Views on Intimate Partner Violence and Its Effect on Children
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:Mattson, Susan D., RNC, CTN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Arizona State University
Co-Authors:Ester Ruiz, RN, CNS, PhD
Objective: Children who witness parental violence are especially susceptible to life-long consequences. Recent exposure to violence in the home is a significant factor in predicting a child’s violent behavior. Earlier research by this author surveyed Latino men and women for their views on IPV and how to prevent it. When “teach the children” was a major theme, a children’s book was developed. Design: Using a naturalistic design, with grounded theory methodology, focus groups were held with Latino men and women regarding IPV. The book was developed from that data, using cognitive learning theory as a framework. Population: 30 Latino men and 34 women were recruited from clinics, a head start school and a domestic violence shelter for focus groups about IPV and ways to decrease the incidence. The children’s book was piloted with 15 children from 2 head start programs. Concepts studied and interventions: IPV, especially its antecedents related to the Mexican culture and how to prevent its occurrence were addressed. Cognitive learning theory was the basis for the book. Methods: Based on earlier work, focus groups were held with Latino men and women regarding IPV. The children’s book that is a result of that research was piloted with head start children.. Findings: The women identified that their husbands abused them because they had seen their fathers abuse their mothers. The men agreed, and both indicated that teaching children to handle anger and conflict differently was the best approach to prevention. Conclusions: A children’s book was developed and piloted with preschoolers, measuring their own feelings of alternative ways of handling anger and conflict. Implications: Utilizing this book in schools and clinics, with instructions by authors how to evaluate effectiveness, and best ways to utilize the content.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleLatino Men and Women's Views on Intimate Partner Violence and Its Effect on Childrenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150106-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Latino Men and Women's Views on Intimate Partner Violence and Its Effect on Children</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Mattson, Susan D., RNC, CTN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Arizona State University</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">susan.mattson@asu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Ester Ruiz, RN, CNS, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: Children who witness parental violence are especially susceptible to life-long consequences. Recent exposure to violence in the home is a significant factor in predicting a child&rsquo;s violent behavior. Earlier research by this author surveyed Latino men and women for their views on IPV and how to prevent it. When &ldquo;teach the children&rdquo; was a major theme, a children&rsquo;s book was developed. Design: Using a naturalistic design, with grounded theory methodology, focus groups were held with Latino men and women regarding IPV. The book was developed from that data, using cognitive learning theory as a framework. Population: 30 Latino men and 34 women were recruited from clinics, a head start school and a domestic violence shelter for focus groups about IPV and ways to decrease the incidence. The children&rsquo;s book was piloted with 15 children from 2 head start programs. Concepts studied and interventions: IPV, especially its antecedents related to the Mexican culture and how to prevent its occurrence were addressed. Cognitive learning theory was the basis for the book. Methods: Based on earlier work, focus groups were held with Latino men and women regarding IPV. The children&rsquo;s book that is a result of that research was piloted with head start children.. Findings: The women identified that their husbands abused them because they had seen their fathers abuse their mothers. The men agreed, and both indicated that teaching children to handle anger and conflict differently was the best approach to prevention. Conclusions: A children&rsquo;s book was developed and piloted with preschoolers, measuring their own feelings of alternative ways of handling anger and conflict. Implications: Utilizing this book in schools and clinics, with instructions by authors how to evaluate effectiveness, and best ways to utilize the content.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:16:37Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:16:37Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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