Nurses' Social Interactions: Do They Serve as a Conduit for Research-Based Knowledge Use in Acute Care Settings?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150112
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nurses' Social Interactions: Do They Serve as a Conduit for Research-Based Knowledge Use in Acute Care Settings?
Abstract:
Nurses' Social Interactions: Do They Serve as a Conduit for Research-Based Knowledge Use in Acute Care Settings?
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:Milner, F. Margaret, BScN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Alberta
Title:MN Student
Co-Authors:Joanne Profetto-McGrath, RN, MEd, PhD; Carole A. Estabrooks, RN, PhD
Accessibility to research-based information is important to the ongoing advancement of an evidence-based culture. Social interactions are thought to be a significant ‘conduit’ between human sources to achieve this goal. Social interaction is a process through which nurses communicate, connect, form relationships, and exchange information between and among patients/families, each other, and other health care professionals. This presentation will be of interest to practitioners, educators, researchers, and administrators seeking to enhance evidence-based clinical decision-making. Objective: This presentation focuses on the nature of nurses’ social interactions within a context of pain management. Specifically, the following questions will be addressed: 1. Do nurses’ social interactions influence their use of research to inform clinical decision-making? 2. Are there differences between nurses’ formal and informal social interactions? 3. What factors influence social interactions at the unit level? Design: Ethnographic and comparative case study. Setting, Population/Sample: The setting consists of two adult surgical units and five pediatric units at four tertiary hospitals located in two Canadian provinces. The population of interest includes nursing staff, patients and families, and other health care professionals and administrators. Variables: Social interactions, clinical decision-making, research use, unit/organizational culture, and environment. Methods: Qualitative data collected through participant observation, interviews, card sorts, and focus groups during a six-month period on each of the seven units. Findings and Related Implications: Based on the qualitative analysis completed to date, social interaction acts as an important vehicle for accessing and transferring knowledge that informs clinical decision-making especially under conditions of uncertainty.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNurses' Social Interactions: Do They Serve as a Conduit for Research-Based Knowledge Use in Acute Care Settings?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150112-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Nurses' Social Interactions: Do They Serve as a Conduit for Research-Based Knowledge Use in Acute Care Settings?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Milner, F. Margaret, BScN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Alberta</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">MN Student</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">fmilner@ualberta.ca</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Joanne Profetto-McGrath, RN, MEd, PhD; Carole A. Estabrooks, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Accessibility to research-based information is important to the ongoing advancement of an evidence-based culture. Social interactions are thought to be a significant &lsquo;conduit&rsquo; between human sources to achieve this goal. Social interaction is a process through which nurses communicate, connect, form relationships, and exchange information between and among patients/families, each other, and other health care professionals. This presentation will be of interest to practitioners, educators, researchers, and administrators seeking to enhance evidence-based clinical decision-making. Objective: This presentation focuses on the nature of nurses&rsquo; social interactions within a context of pain management. Specifically, the following questions will be addressed: 1. Do nurses&rsquo; social interactions influence their use of research to inform clinical decision-making? 2. Are there differences between nurses&rsquo; formal and informal social interactions? 3. What factors influence social interactions at the unit level? Design: Ethnographic and comparative case study. Setting, Population/Sample: The setting consists of two adult surgical units and five pediatric units at four tertiary hospitals located in two Canadian provinces. The population of interest includes nursing staff, patients and families, and other health care professionals and administrators. Variables: Social interactions, clinical decision-making, research use, unit/organizational culture, and environment. Methods: Qualitative data collected through participant observation, interviews, card sorts, and focus groups during a six-month period on each of the seven units. Findings and Related Implications: Based on the qualitative analysis completed to date, social interaction acts as an important vehicle for accessing and transferring knowledge that informs clinical decision-making especially under conditions of uncertainty.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:16:45Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:16:45Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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