2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150123
Type:
Presentation
Title:
I Grieve
Abstract:
I Grieve
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:Nieves, Christina Impoco, RN, MSN, FNP
P.I. Institution Name:N/A
“I Grieve” is a series of five sculptings depicting each stage of the dying process as put forth by Dr. Elizabeth Kubler Ross. Denial, anger, bargaining, depression and acceptance become concrete realities taking the form of corresponding human faces twisted with emotion. This work reflects the shared human experience of grief and the dying process. It mirrors and parallels the contorted countenance and anguish in suffering, of both body and soul. Utilizing techniques inspired from the art of bas-relief, each image is an unearthing of deep, raw emotion. Thick, white spackling compound provides a pliable medium to tangibly birth these emotions onto canvas. As an expressive art form, sculpting is valuable in adding a sense of dimension and reality. Exagerating facial features and muscle tone emphasizes depth and expanse of emotion. Stark white speaks to a harsh reality and paleness of spirit. Working with individuals and groups allows me to explore the value of sculpting as an expressive art form with those engaged in the grieving process. Interactions with the artwork include; handling the pieces, writing, drawing, and dialoguing. This connection proves powerful. Participant response is fascinating yielding an array of emotion, including, resistance, awakening, and reintegration of previously disassociated feelings. This work suggests the expressive arts play a vital role in supporting an atmosphere of healing for the grieving heart. Artistic expression engages both nurse and client in a holistic fashion, contributing to a deeper sense of healing, connectedness and presence. Aesthetics as paradigm, and the expressive arts as praxis, may be the key for nursing to truly build fantastic and diverse personal and global relationships.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleI Grieveen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150123-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">I Grieve</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Nieves, Christina Impoco, RN, MSN, FNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">N/A</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">christina@esperanzafineart.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">&ldquo;I Grieve&rdquo; is a series of five sculptings depicting each stage of the dying process as put forth by Dr. Elizabeth Kubler Ross. Denial, anger, bargaining, depression and acceptance become concrete realities taking the form of corresponding human faces twisted with emotion. This work reflects the shared human experience of grief and the dying process. It mirrors and parallels the contorted countenance and anguish in suffering, of both body and soul. Utilizing techniques inspired from the art of bas-relief, each image is an unearthing of deep, raw emotion. Thick, white spackling compound provides a pliable medium to tangibly birth these emotions onto canvas. As an expressive art form, sculpting is valuable in adding a sense of dimension and reality. Exagerating facial features and muscle tone emphasizes depth and expanse of emotion. Stark white speaks to a harsh reality and paleness of spirit. Working with individuals and groups allows me to explore the value of sculpting as an expressive art form with those engaged in the grieving process. Interactions with the artwork include; handling the pieces, writing, drawing, and dialoguing. This connection proves powerful. Participant response is fascinating yielding an array of emotion, including, resistance, awakening, and reintegration of previously disassociated feelings. This work suggests the expressive arts play a vital role in supporting an atmosphere of healing for the grieving heart. Artistic expression engages both nurse and client in a holistic fashion, contributing to a deeper sense of healing, connectedness and presence. Aesthetics as paradigm, and the expressive arts as praxis, may be the key for nursing to truly build fantastic and diverse personal and global relationships.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:17:01Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:17:01Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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