Examining the Impact on the Family Managing a Depressed/Suicidal Member at Home

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150127
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Examining the Impact on the Family Managing a Depressed/Suicidal Member at Home
Abstract:
Examining the Impact on the Family Managing a Depressed/Suicidal Member at Home
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:Nosek, Cheryl, RN, DNS
P.I. Institution Name:Daemen College
Title:Assistant Professor
Depression is a serious mental illness that affects many American families each year, carrying with it a risk for suicide. The current managed mental health system has restricted inpatient days allowed for depressed/suicidal patients. They are discharged while still acutely ill, placing their families in the position of managing their care when there is continuing lethality. Objective: The purposes of this study were to examine the impact of caring for a depressed/suicidal family member and to understand the process(es) families use to manage this care. Design: A qualitative design was utilized. Data were collected via audiotaped interviews in the families’ homes. Population, Sample, Setting: Purposeful sampling was employed to recruit 17 family members for primary interviews. Secondary interviews were conducted with three of these families to confirm the initial findings. Method: The Grounded Theory method (Glaser & Strauss, 1967) was used for data collection and analysis. Findings: The data provided evidence of a significant impact on these families, which was affected by the amount of time spent with the depressed/suicidal member and the degree of risk for suicide. The data analysis also revealed the basic social process of MAINTAINING VIGILANCE THROUGH MANAGING. A theoretical model emerged that depicts this ongoing, cyclical process by which families manage their depressed/suicidal member at home. Families begin this process at a point of not knowing. They move on to identifying, gaining awareness, then knowing or understanding. This allows them to take action, which is followed by watching/waiting. They then return to gaining awareness armed with new knowledge/understanding. Implications: An important implication for nursing is that these families desperately need to be involved in the care provided. To preserve the integrity of these families, they need support and assistance in developing strategies to assist in the ongoing care of their depressed/suicidal member.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleExamining the Impact on the Family Managing a Depressed/Suicidal Member at Homeen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150127-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Examining the Impact on the Family Managing a Depressed/Suicidal Member at Home</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Nosek, Cheryl, RN, DNS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Daemen College</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cnosek@adelphia.net</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Depression is a serious mental illness that affects many American families each year, carrying with it a risk for suicide. The current managed mental health system has restricted inpatient days allowed for depressed/suicidal patients. They are discharged while still acutely ill, placing their families in the position of managing their care when there is continuing lethality. Objective: The purposes of this study were to examine the impact of caring for a depressed/suicidal family member and to understand the process(es) families use to manage this care. Design: A qualitative design was utilized. Data were collected via audiotaped interviews in the families&rsquo; homes. Population, Sample, Setting: Purposeful sampling was employed to recruit 17 family members for primary interviews. Secondary interviews were conducted with three of these families to confirm the initial findings. Method: The Grounded Theory method (Glaser &amp; Strauss, 1967) was used for data collection and analysis. Findings: The data provided evidence of a significant impact on these families, which was affected by the amount of time spent with the depressed/suicidal member and the degree of risk for suicide. The data analysis also revealed the basic social process of MAINTAINING VIGILANCE THROUGH MANAGING. A theoretical model emerged that depicts this ongoing, cyclical process by which families manage their depressed/suicidal member at home. Families begin this process at a point of not knowing. They move on to identifying, gaining awareness, then knowing or understanding. This allows them to take action, which is followed by watching/waiting. They then return to gaining awareness armed with new knowledge/understanding. Implications: An important implication for nursing is that these families desperately need to be involved in the care provided. To preserve the integrity of these families, they need support and assistance in developing strategies to assist in the ongoing care of their depressed/suicidal member.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:17:07Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:17:07Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.