Methodological and Measurement Challenges in Conducting an International Study of Nursing Turnover – Lessons from the Pilot Study

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150128
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Methodological and Measurement Challenges in Conducting an International Study of Nursing Turnover – Lessons from the Pilot Study
Abstract:
Methodological and Measurement Challenges in Conducting an International Study of Nursing Turnover – Lessons from the Pilot Study
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:O'Brien-Pallas, Linda L., RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Toronto
Title:Professor & CHSRF/CIHR National Chair in Nursing Human Resources
Co-Authors:Christine Duffield, RN, BScN, MHP, PhD, FACHSE; Pat Griffin, RN, PhD; Patricia Hinton Walker, PhD, RN, FAAN; Heather K. S. Laschinger, RN, PhD; Judith Shamian, RN, PhD; Patricia W. Stone, PhD, MPH, RN
Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to report on the measurement and methodological challenges in conducting an international study on nursing turnover. Design: A purposive cross section of medical and surgical units was selected from one province or state in each of the countries studied. Population, Setting, and Sample: Unit Managers from two medical and two surgical units from each country were asked to participate in the pilot study. Surveys were distributed in Australia, Canada, New Zealand, the United Kingdom, the United States, and Scotland. Methods: The survey used in the pilot study was adapted from Buchan’s (1999) earlier work and included a series of questions related to budgeted full-time equivalents, new hires, turnover, and direct and indirect costs of turnover on the nursing unit in the last six months. Respondents indicated actual responses to the questions and availability of data for the study. Results: Most Unit Managers were able to provide data to determine occupancy and turnover rates and termination replacement costs. Some difficulties were experienced in isolating other direct costs per hire including recruitment costs and administrative time per new employee. Costs associated with training new employees and with productivity losses (while new employees learn new jobs) were challenging to collect. Unit Managers’ access to financial and utilization data bases in the organizations in which they are employed need to be improved. Conclusion: In completing the main study on nursing turnover, many data holders beyond the Unit Manager will have to be approached. The researchers plan to send all surveys well in advance of interviews so that all data sources and data holders are consulted prior to site visits. Implications: The degree of time spent in understanding each institution’s reporting practices prior to completing data collection will enhance the response rate and quality of data provided.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMethodological and Measurement Challenges in Conducting an International Study of Nursing Turnover – Lessons from the Pilot Studyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150128-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Methodological and Measurement Challenges in Conducting an International Study of Nursing Turnover &ndash; Lessons from the Pilot Study</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">O'Brien-Pallas, Linda L., RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Toronto</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor &amp; CHSRF/CIHR National Chair in Nursing Human Resources</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">l.obrien.pallas@utoronto.ca</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Christine Duffield, RN, BScN, MHP, PhD, FACHSE; Pat Griffin, RN, PhD; Patricia Hinton Walker, PhD, RN, FAAN; Heather K. S. Laschinger, RN, PhD; Judith Shamian, RN, PhD; Patricia W. Stone, PhD, MPH, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to report on the measurement and methodological challenges in conducting an international study on nursing turnover. Design: A purposive cross section of medical and surgical units was selected from one province or state in each of the countries studied. Population, Setting, and Sample: Unit Managers from two medical and two surgical units from each country were asked to participate in the pilot study. Surveys were distributed in Australia, Canada, New Zealand, the United Kingdom, the United States, and Scotland. Methods: The survey used in the pilot study was adapted from Buchan&rsquo;s (1999) earlier work and included a series of questions related to budgeted full-time equivalents, new hires, turnover, and direct and indirect costs of turnover on the nursing unit in the last six months. Respondents indicated actual responses to the questions and availability of data for the study. Results: Most Unit Managers were able to provide data to determine occupancy and turnover rates and termination replacement costs. Some difficulties were experienced in isolating other direct costs per hire including recruitment costs and administrative time per new employee. Costs associated with training new employees and with productivity losses (while new employees learn new jobs) were challenging to collect. Unit Managers&rsquo; access to financial and utilization data bases in the organizations in which they are employed need to be improved. Conclusion: In completing the main study on nursing turnover, many data holders beyond the Unit Manager will have to be approached. The researchers plan to send all surveys well in advance of interviews so that all data sources and data holders are consulted prior to site visits. Implications: The degree of time spent in understanding each institution&rsquo;s reporting practices prior to completing data collection will enhance the response rate and quality of data provided.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:17:08Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:17:08Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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