2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150135
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Leading Nursing Students When the Environment Is Terrorism
Abstract:
Leading Nursing Students When the Environment Is Terrorism
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:Persell, Deborah J., MSN, RN, CPNP
P.I. Institution Name:Arkansas State University
Title:Asst. Prof. of Nursing
Co-Authors:Charlotte Young, RN, PhD
Purpose: To investigate major concerns and learning needs perceived by nursing students related to a biological, chemical and nuclear terrorism attack. Method: This is an integrated quantitative/qualitative phenomenological study. Includes purposeful sampling of 95 junior and senior nursing students within a state university, utilizing an open-ended questionnaire. Findings: Findings revealed unexpected identification of ethical conflicts. Triage decisions were not only difficult but also abandoned by some with unsolicited comments reflecting their conflict at deciding which patients would receive care. Concerns about personal risk and risk to their families were also found to influence whether or not students would choose to provide care at all in the event of a terrorist attack. The lack of knowledge about biological, chemical and nuclear terrorism was evident as students assessed their personal risk in those situations. Conclusions: Based on this study there are significant knowledge gaps related to nursing care of victims of terrorism that did not always translate into knowing what knowledge was missing or how to go about finding it. It will be the responsibility of nurse educators to lead nursing students through issues of knowledge, professionalism, nursing interventions, risk assessment, and provision of care should a terrorist attack occur.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleLeading Nursing Students When the Environment Is Terrorismen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150135-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Leading Nursing Students When the Environment Is Terrorism</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Persell, Deborah J., MSN, RN, CPNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Arkansas State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Asst. Prof. of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dpersell@astate.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Charlotte Young, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: To investigate major concerns and learning needs perceived by nursing students related to a biological, chemical and nuclear terrorism attack. Method: This is an integrated quantitative/qualitative phenomenological study. Includes purposeful sampling of 95 junior and senior nursing students within a state university, utilizing an open-ended questionnaire. Findings: Findings revealed unexpected identification of ethical conflicts. Triage decisions were not only difficult but also abandoned by some with unsolicited comments reflecting their conflict at deciding which patients would receive care. Concerns about personal risk and risk to their families were also found to influence whether or not students would choose to provide care at all in the event of a terrorist attack. The lack of knowledge about biological, chemical and nuclear terrorism was evident as students assessed their personal risk in those situations. Conclusions: Based on this study there are significant knowledge gaps related to nursing care of victims of terrorism that did not always translate into knowing what knowledge was missing or how to go about finding it. It will be the responsibility of nurse educators to lead nursing students through issues of knowledge, professionalism, nursing interventions, risk assessment, and provision of care should a terrorist attack occur.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:17:18Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:17:18Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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