Relationship Between Adherence to Antihypertensive Medication and Blood Pressure

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/150160
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Relationship Between Adherence to Antihypertensive Medication and Blood Pressure
Abstract:
Relationship Between Adherence to Antihypertensive Medication and Blood Pressure
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:Schlenk, Elizabeth A., PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Pittsburgh
Co-Authors:Mildred Jones, PhD, RN; Julius Kitutu, PhD; Susan Sereika, PhD; Willa Doswell, PhD, RN, FAAN; Jacqueline Dunbar-Jacob, PhD, RN, FAAN
Objective: The objective was to determine if there was a relationship between adherence and blood pressure (BP) controlling for selected demographics. Design: A descriptive design was used in this secondary analysis of data from a larger study of ethnic differences in antihypertensive medication adherence. Sample: Subjects (N=105) at least 35 years old on pharmacological treatment for hypertension were recruited at BP screenings. The sample was 56% (n=59) African American, 71% (n=75) female, 54% (n=57) married, 50% (n=52) employed, late mid-life (M=61.4 years, SD=12.6), well educated (M=13.7 years, SD=2.8), with an income =>$30,000 (55%, n=49), BP of 145/83 (SD=16/11), and hypertension for 12.0 years (SD=11.7). Methods: BP was taken at enrollment, questionnaires were completed by telephone interview, and medication electronic event monitors were used for 90 days. Findings: Three adherence measures were used with adherence defined as =>80%. Eighty-six percent were adherent for doses taken, 71% for days adherent, and 53% for optimal intervals. Hierarchical stepwise regression with age, race, years education, and household income entered in the first block and adherence entered in the second block in a forward fashion within blocks showed that doses taken [Change F(1,85)=3.988, Change R-square=.034, p=.049], days adherent [Change F(1,85)=4.898, Change R-square=.041, p=.030], and optimal intervals [Change F(1,85)=8.021, Change R-square=.065, p=.006] explained significant additional variance in diastolic BP but not systolic BP. The full models explained 26%-29% of the variance in diastolic BP. Conclusions: Between 53% and 86% of subjects were classified as adherent based on the measure used. Older age, Caucasian race, and good adherence were associated with lower diastolic BP. Implications: Interventions to improve BP control should focus on strategies to improve adherence to antihypertensive medication.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRelationship Between Adherence to Antihypertensive Medication and Blood Pressureen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/150160-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Relationship Between Adherence to Antihypertensive Medication and Blood Pressure</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Schlenk, Elizabeth A., PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Pittsburgh</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">els100@pitt.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Mildred Jones, PhD, RN; Julius Kitutu, PhD; Susan Sereika, PhD; Willa Doswell, PhD, RN, FAAN; Jacqueline Dunbar-Jacob, PhD, RN, FAAN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: The objective was to determine if there was a relationship between adherence and blood pressure (BP) controlling for selected demographics. Design: A descriptive design was used in this secondary analysis of data from a larger study of ethnic differences in antihypertensive medication adherence. Sample: Subjects (N=105) at least 35 years old on pharmacological treatment for hypertension were recruited at BP screenings. The sample was 56% (n=59) African American, 71% (n=75) female, 54% (n=57) married, 50% (n=52) employed, late mid-life (M=61.4 years, SD=12.6), well educated (M=13.7 years, SD=2.8), with an income =&gt;$30,000 (55%, n=49), BP of 145/83 (SD=16/11), and hypertension for 12.0 years (SD=11.7). Methods: BP was taken at enrollment, questionnaires were completed by telephone interview, and medication electronic event monitors were used for 90 days. Findings: Three adherence measures were used with adherence defined as =&gt;80%. Eighty-six percent were adherent for doses taken, 71% for days adherent, and 53% for optimal intervals. Hierarchical stepwise regression with age, race, years education, and household income entered in the first block and adherence entered in the second block in a forward fashion within blocks showed that doses taken [Change F(1,85)=3.988, Change R-square=.034, p=.049], days adherent [Change F(1,85)=4.898, Change R-square=.041, p=.030], and optimal intervals [Change F(1,85)=8.021, Change R-square=.065, p=.006] explained significant additional variance in diastolic BP but not systolic BP. The full models explained 26%-29% of the variance in diastolic BP. Conclusions: Between 53% and 86% of subjects were classified as adherent based on the measure used. Older age, Caucasian race, and good adherence were associated with lower diastolic BP. Implications: Interventions to improve BP control should focus on strategies to improve adherence to antihypertensive medication.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:17:52Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:17:52Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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